In the grounds of one of our New York suburban rural Editors, there bloomed last year a beautiful rose, which seems to have given him an unbounded degree of delight, and to have been the admiration of visitors. His story is told by himself, as follows, in his diary of "Daily Rural Life:"

"My gardener purchased from one of our large florists a dozen plants of a Coun-tesse de Bertha rose, which has proved to be one of the best perpetual blooming sorts that I have seen. The flowers are of a deep pink color, quite large, double and elegant in form, and the fragrance is most exquisite, being entirely undescribable, but may be called a spiced-sweetened Tea. A bud cut off when it begins to open, and placed in a room, will perfume the entire atmosphere within, for one or two days. The plants are very vigorous, not being subject to mildew in the house, and they bloom almost continually; even small plants struck out from cuttings, bloom when only a few months old. We may have more showy varieties, but there are few that will please better than the Countesse de Bertha."

A Beautiful Rose #1

About a year ago, Bays "Daily Rural Life," in the Rural New-Yorker, my gardener purchased, from one of our large florists, a dozen plants of a Countesse de Bertha rose, which has proved to be one of the best perpetual blooming . sorts that I have seen. The flowers are of a deep pink color, quite large, double and elegant in form, and the fragrance is most exquisite, being entirely indescribable, but may be called a spiced sweetened Tea. A bud cut off when it begins to open, and placed in a room, will perfume the entire atmosphere within for one or two days. The plants are very vigorous, not being subject to mildew in the house, and they bloom almost continually; even small plants struck out from cuttings bloom when only a few months old. We may have more showy varieties, but there are few that will please better than the Countess de Bertha.

The " Geographical Garden" is one of the latest novelties in Paris. The idea seems to be to inform the masses a little more definitely as to the whereabouts of Persia. A space of ground is laid out to represent the " five-quarters " of the world; kingdoms are separated by gravel walks, and continents by rills. The geography of the globe can be learned in an afternoon, and a voyage around the world can be taken for one franc.

A Beautiful Rose #2

The London Gardeners' Magazine describes a rose now growing at Mr. Harrison's nursery at Darlington, which is certainly a beauty. The tree is three years old, budded on the Manetti stock, but is now growing on both the Manetti and its own roots. It covers eight lights four feet broad by ten feet long. The house is spanned roof. This spring Mr. Harrison has cut about two thousand roses, and a third crop is now approaching maturity. These blooms find a ready market. In early spring they sell at sixpence each. Two thousand blooms at threepence each would produce 25.