I have thought it would be fitting, c*»uld a suitable space of ground be had near where he has passed so many of his useful hours, midst his family and his garden, looking down upon the noble Hudson, the river of his choice, in which might be planted the native trees of our country, and the ornamental ones of others - such as the numerous nurserymen, and all his admirers, would be glad to appropriate for the purpose, to he gathered from all localities possible - there to be plauted around such enclosure, and about the resting place of one so admired when living, so lamented when dead. .It would mark the spot of him who loved the soil - its cultivation - and its em--bellishment, and whose example all would like to imitate.

Such a plan carried out, to be superintended by judicious and qualified friends,-would be in harmony with the character of him whose memory we would perpetuate. J. H. Watts. Rochester. August 12, 1852.

A Monument To Mr. Downing #1

Under this head, Mr. J. H. Watts, in the September number of the Horticulturist, proposes that a piece of ground in the neighborhood of Mr. Downino's late residence, be selected, " in which might be planted the native trees of our country, and the ornamental ones of others - such as the numerous nurserymen, and all his admirers, would be glad to appropriate for the purpose, to be gathered from all localities possible - there to be planted around such enclosure, and about the resting place of one so admired when living, so lamented when dead".

It is much to be desired that this idea should be carried into execution; and it has occurred to me that no better or move appropriate device for a Monument to be placed within such enclosure, could be designed, than the Vase of Fruit which monthly decorates the cover of the " Horticulturist." It should be constructed of free stone, or marble; and I cannot doubt that the cost would readily be defrayed by the numerous subscribers to the Horticulturist. A. Cod-man. Roxbury, Sept. 18, 1852.