The Second Annual Meeting of the United States Agricultural Society, will be held at Washington, D. C, on Wednesday, February 22d, 1854.

The United States Agricultural Society #1

The last meeting of this society has given hope that it is to be a permanent and efficient organization. There was a large and influential representation of the agricultural interest, the proceedings were harmonious, and the discussions of an unusually important character. The great objects of the society seem to be fairly understood, and the country will regard it with increased interest The annual meetings hereafter are to be held in January, and a great mass meeting is announced for 1856, to consult and lay plans for the future. Farmers, rally around this society, and around all societies whose objects are to advance the interests of your profession. Without your hearty support, they cannot serve you. Let this great meeting of American agriculturists in 1856, be such as we have not heard of before, and something will result from it worthy of being put upon record. We find the following in the Germantown Telegraph:

"The annual meeting of the United States Agricultural Society, convened at Washington on Wednesday last, Hon. Marshall P. Wilder, President, in the chair. A majority of the States was represented. The President opened the session with an excellent address, which was well received. Numerous committees were then appointed, and resolutions offered. In the evening George Washington Parke Custis, the only surviving relative of the Washington family, lectured on the agricultural character of his father by adoption - the Farmer of Mount Vernon. He was listened to with great attention and satisfaction.

"The society re-assembled on Thursday morning, and after receiving reports from various committees, elected officers for the ensuing year, as follows: President, Marshall P. Wilder, of Massachusetts, and a Y. President from each State and Territory. Executive Committee - Messrs. King, of New York; Calvert, of Maryland; Poork, of Massachusetts; Watts, of Ohio; Jones, of Delaware ; Elwyn, of Pennsylvania, and Wentworth, of Illinois. William S. King, of Boston, was chosen Secretary, and B. B. French, of Washington, Treasurer.

"The reciprocity question, on resolutions offered by Mr. Holoomb of Delaware, was discussed at considerable length, and warmly, during the morning and afternoon session, with reference to its influence upon agricultural interests, and a series of resolutions were finally adopted, objecting to the doctrine of free trade for agriculture, and protection for other interests. Many valuable papers were also read and discussed.

"In the evening, the Hon. George P. Marsh, late resident minister to Constantinople, delivered a highly interesting lecture on the rural economy of Europe.

" Another session was held on Friday, which we were unable to attend, in consequence of being obliged to leave for home; but which, we are informed, was principally taken up in a continuation of the debate of the day before, on the reciprocity question. Resolutions were finally adopted calling on the agriculturists of the whole country to meet in convention in Washington, in Feb-ruary next, to determine for themselves what legislation is necessary for their preservation. A number of reports from committees were read, and after accepting invitations to visit several public institutions, the society adjourned.

" In the evening a large number of members called on Senator Clayton, to thank him for taking the position he did the day before in the Senate in behalf of agriculture.

Altogether this was a highly gratifying and auspicious meeting, exhibiting, in a marked manner, not only the interest which is felt in every section of the country for a union of effort in behalf of agriculture, but of the elevated intelligence of those who there came together for a common purpose.

"Before closing this brief sketch, we desire to express our satisfaction with the able manner in which Col. Wilder - who was unanimously re-elected President - discharged the duties of his post No similar officer, in either house of Congress, within our knowledge, has shown a superior ability.

Double While flowering Almond.

Double While flowering Almond.

Double crimson flowering Peach.

Double crimson flowering Peach.

THE VILLA MANSION.

THE VILLA MANSION.

The United States Agricultural Society #2

We would call especial attention to the grand scale of preparations for the approaching show of the United States Agricultural Society at Boston. Under the direction of Mr. Wilder, backed by the liberality of the other merchant princes of Boston, we feel confident that it will surpass any Exhibition that has been yet held.