Question. - Are Not Many Ornamental Trees Lost By Not Being Pruned At The Roots?

Mr. Fuller. - Trees are set out like posts, and that is the last of it. If it was not for the slops in gutters, trees would not grow.

Mr. Hill, of Nyack, exhibited some fine paintings.

"Neglected Native Fruits and Plants" were selected for the next meeting, and the Society adjourned.

Question Are Not Many Ornamental Trees Lost By Not 170025DUCHESSE D'ANGOULEME PEAR.

DUCHESSE D'ANGOULEME PEAR.

(Engraved for the Horticulturist).

Question. - Which Are The Best 12 Herbaceous Plants For City Gardens?

Mr. Fuller. - Dielytra spectabilis, blue Delphinium, Spiraea filipendula, Double White and Double Red Lychnis, DoubleWhite Campanula, Campanula grandiflora, Oriental Poppy, Phlox, Chrysanthemum, Pentstemon.

It was moved, that at the next meeting there be handed in a list of herbaceous plants, of 50 different kinds.

Quevejdo. Drawings And Colored Plates Of Fruits

In a former number of our journal we took occasion to draw the attention of our horticulturists to the value of Joseph Prestele, Sen., of Amana Homestead, Iowa, as a capable delineator, and one on whom patronage would be most worthily bestowed. We are not disposed to advertise free for any one able to pay, but we favor and appreciate talent, and when capacities of a high order have been overlooked and suffered to be comparatively lost, believe in bringing them before the public for the public good. We have never met Mr. Prestele; but when such men as the late A. J. Downing and Prof. Asa Gray employ his talents and taste over any European delineaists, we feel that we are right in directing the attention of those who desire careful and accurate work.

The Quince On The Juneberry

Mr. F. K. Phoenix, in the Gardener's Monthly, relates an experiment in the working the Angers quince on the Juneberry (Shad or Senice) four feet or so from the ground. The quince grew well, and soon commenced bearing, and has borne nearly every year since. But, being in an apple orchard, the apple trees have prevented any fair development or test. The cross working has seemed to make the quince more hardy than any other method I have tried. The pear also takes moderately well on that stock, and I think should be worked and tested on that stock for the north. I think the June-berry is among the very hardiest northern trees or shrubs.

Please correct a mistake in my remarks on the strawberry in the September number. Where it reads " Cat and Jack," " Captain Jack " is what it should be. S. Miller.

Blufton, Mo

Quince On The Thorn

A correspondent of the Country Gentleman says the quince does admirably upon the White Thorn, either by budding or grafting. So propagated, the grub, which works upon the root of the quince, is avoided. The tree is somewhat dwarfed, thus worked, comes into bearing sooner than upon its own roots, and a crop almost a sure thing annually.