Up to the 18th of this Month, March, there had been for many years no spring so late and cold as this. In these respects it was even more striking than that of 1845, Continually frosty nights, little sun, no material rise of the thermometer during the day; from these causes, the temperature of the earth, which is a better indicator of weather than that of the air, was actually lower than it had been within any period during which registers to which we have access, have been kept. It is true, indeed, that in March, 1845, the earth, 2 feet below the surface, was on one occasion as low as 36 degrees, and that in this year thegco-thermometer had not fallen lower; but the mean of the month, at 2 feet under ground, was up to that time, lower than in 1845, by more than half a degree. The following return proves this.

The temperature of the earth in the garden of the Horticultural Society, for the first 18 days of March, has been as under -

1 foot Deep

2 feet Deep.

3 feet Deep.

March

1

37.5

38.5

41.0

2

38.0

39.0

41.0

3

37.0

38.0

41.0

4

37.0

37.0

40.5

5

36.0

37.5

40.0

6

38.0

37.0

40.0

7

35.5

36.0

40.0

8

30.5

30.5

40.0

9

37.5

37.0

40.0

10

38.5

37.5

40.0

11

38.5

37.5

40.0

12

38.5

38.0

40.0

13

38.0

38.0

40.5

14

38.0

38.0

41.0

15

38. 5

38 0

41.0

16

39.0

380

41.0

17

40.0

39.0

41.0

I8

40.0

39.0

41.0

37.77

37.75

40.5

Mean of March.

2 feef.

41.46

1839...

41.93

1840........

41.71

1844...

42.24

1845....

38.78

1846..........

45.55

1847..........

41.03

1848...

43.72

1849...

43.70

1850..........

42..'(3

General av'ge.

41.74

Min. of March,.

2feet.

1838....

38. 5

1839....

39

1840..........

39

1844..........

40

1845......

36

1846..........

44

1847...

38

1848....

42.50

1849....

42.50

1850..........

40

Since the 18th the sun has gained some strength, and the temperature of the air by day has not been lower than 47 degrees, while on the 22d and 24th, it rose to 66 degrees. Still vegetation is almost torpid; buds are swelling very slowly, and the early blossoms have for the most part, a shrunken, half-starved aspect. The continued low temperature at night, fluctuating between 25 and 28 degrees, explains this; for so little effect has the sun yet produced, that at the present moment the earth 2 feet under ground, has not gained more than 42 degrees, and this maximum still remains less than the mean of 1844, 1846, 1848, 1849, and 1850. - London Gard, Chron.