Myrtenol 141

Myrtenol, C10H16O, is the name applied by v. Soden and Elze3) to an alcohol which they found, mostly as acetic ester, in oil of myrtle.

Its acid phthalic ester melts at 116° from which the alcohol can be regenerated as a colorless oil possessing the odor of myrtle. Its constants are:

B. p. 220 to 221° (751 mm.), 79,5 to 80° (3,5 mm.); d15o0,985; aD + 49° 25'.

Myrtenol has been examined closer by Semmler and Bartelt4) who have found the following constants:

B. p. 222 to 224°, 102,5° (9 mm.); d20o 0,9763; aD + 45° 45'; nD 1,49668.

1) Wallach, Liebig's Annalen 346 (1906), 227.

2) Wallach, Liebig's Annalen 277 (1893), 149.

3) Chem. Ztg. 29 (1905), 1031.

4) Berl. Berichte 40 (1907), 1363.

With phosphorus pentachloride, a chloride C10H15C1 was obtained which upon reduction with alcohol and sodium yielded pinene. The above formula by Semmler and Bartelt is based on these facts. Upon oxidation with chromic acid, the aldehyde myr-tenal C10H14O results (b. p. 87 to 90° under 10 mm.; d20o0,9876; nD 1,50420). It is further characterized by its semicarbazone, m. p. 230°, and its oxime melting at 71 to 72°. For identification, myrtenol can be either converted into the acid phthalic ester (m. p. 114 to 115°) or oxidized to myrtenal.