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Lessons on Massage | by Margaret D. Palmer



At the earnest and often-repeated request of my pupils, I publish my lessons on massage, in the hope that they and others will find them as useful as they anticipate. The instructions given are founded upon the results of many years' experience, both in teaching and in practical work.

TitleLessons on Massage
AuthorMargaret D. Palmer
PublisherLondon Baillière, Tindall And Cox
Year1916
Copyright1916 London Baillière, Tindall And Cox

Lessons On Massage

By

Margaret D. Palmer

Formerly Masseuse And Manager Of The Massage Department Of The

London Hospital, And Instructor Of Massage To The Nursing

Staff ; A Founder Of, And Examiner To, The Incorporated

Society Of Trained Masseuses

London Baillière, Tindall And Cox

8, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden 1916

First Edition, August, 1901
Second Edition, June, 1903
Reprinted, March, 1904
Reprinted, December, 1905
Third Edition, December, 1906
Reprinted, March, 1908
Reprinted, February, 1909
Reprinted, October, 1909
Reprinted, April, 1910
Reprinted, February, 1911
Fourth Edition, February, 1912
Reprinted, September, 1915
Reprinted, April, 1916.

Part I: Chapter I: History of Massage

-Preface
Preface To Fourth Edition The continued demand for ' Lessons on Massage ' has made another edition necessary. I have made some alterations and a few additions.
-A Short History Of Massage
From the earliest times rubbing of some sort has been used for curative purposes. It is known to have been employed by the Chinese as far back as 3000 b.c. It ...

Part II: Chapter II: Theory of Massage

-The Theory Of Massage
The first thing requisite for the student is to grasp the theory of massage ; a knowledge of mere rubbing is not sufficient. Therefore not only must the ...
-Effleurage
This movement may be done with the lightest touch of the tips of the fingers, or with the whole palmar surface of the hand held in different ways, and with ...
-Petrissage
This is a deep movement, and done on the muscles, which are grasped p>between the thumbs and fingers, or in the palms of the hands, and p>kneaded, rolled, and ...
-Massage À Friction
Friction differs from pétrissage proper in that the muscles are not raised or drawn away from the bone. It is done with the cushion of the thumb, or of the ...
-Vibrations
The ends of the fingers, or the knuckles of the closed hand, or the palmar surface of the hand, are placed on some part of the patient's body; it may be on a ...

Part III: Chapter III: The Human Body

-The Human Body
Physiology is the science which treats of the uses of the various parts of the body. Anatomy is the science which treats of the structure of the various parts ...
-Table Of Bones
Head Cranium (8) : Face (14) : Occipital (1). Nasal (2). Parietal (2). Lachrymal (2). Temporal (2). Malar (2). Frontal (1). Superior maxillary (2). Ethmoid (1).
-Joints
Joints are distinguished as movable and immovable ; wherever two or more bones of the skeleton meet a joint is formed. Movable joints are those in which the ...
-Cartilage
Cartilage is very well known under the name of 'gristle'; it is a tough, flexible, elastic substance found in every part of the body ; it has neither ...
-Synovial Membrane
Synovial membrane is composed of a form of connective tissue, and secretes a glairy fluid resembling the white of egg, named synovia. It lines joints, which ...
-Ligaments
Ligaments are bands of strong white fibrous tissue which bind bone to bone, and serve to hold them together, while they permit free movement of the joints. The ...
-Connective Tissue
Connective tissue, also called areolar, fibrous and elastic tissue, is the most widely diffused of all the tissues of the body ; besides enveloping all the ...
-Muscular Tissue
The fleshy covering of the skeleton is called muscle, and by means of it the bones are moved. There are two kinds of muscle voluntary and involuntary ; ...
-Nerve Tissue
Nerve tissue is composed of celis and fibres enclosed by connective tissue and supplied with bloodvessels and lymphatics ; it controls all the other tissues, ...
-Skin
The whole body is covered and protected by skin. It consists of two layers, the epidermis, or scarf skin, and the dermis, or true skin. The former is composed ...
-Mucous Membrane
At all the apertures of the body the skin is directly continued into the mucous membrane, which lines all the cavities into which the apertures open. It ...

Part IV: Chapter IV: The Vascular System

-The Vascular System
The organs of circulation are the 1. Heart. 4. Capillaries. 2. Arteries. 5. Lymphatics. 3. Veins. The heart lies in the thorax between the lungs, rather to the ...
-Systemic Or Greater Circulation
The blood leaves the heart by the aorta the largest artery springing from the left ventricle passes through all its branches to every part of the body, and is ...
-Pulmonary Or Lesser Circulation
The impure or venous blood which is poured into the right auricle by the venae cavae passes into the right ventricle, and leaves the heart by the pulmonary ...
-The Portal Circulation
The gastric, splenic and mesenteric veins, which collect the venous blood from all the digestive organs, unite to form the portal vein, which carries to the ...
-The Coronary Circulation
In this the blood completes a circulation without leaving the heart ; it enters the coronary arteries near the semilunar valves, passes through a capillary ...
-The Coronary Circulation. Venous Return
The blood from the head is returned by the jugular veins. The external jugular vein begins near the angle of the jaw by the union of two smaller veins, the ...
-Arterial Distribution
Arch of aorta : Right and left coronary. Innominate | right common carotid. right subclavian, axillary, brachial. Left common carotid. Left subclavian.
-Arterial Distribution. Venous Return
The veins from the head, face, and neck unite to form external and internal jugular veins. The deep-seated and superficial veins from the upper limbs unite to ...
-Lymphatic System
The Lymphatic System consists of lymphatic capillaries, vessels, glands and two ducts, the right lymphatic duct and the thoracic duct. Lymph is a watery fluid ...

Part V: Chapter V: The Nervous System

-The Nervous System
The nervous system consists of two parts, the Cerebro-spinal and the Sympathetic. The Cerebro-spinal consists of the brain and spinal cord, with all the nerves ...
-The Brain
The great nerve centre of the body, the brain, is the large upper portion of the cerebro-spinal axis, which fills the cavity of the skull. It consists chiefly ...
-The Spinal Cord
The spinal cord is a continuation of the brain extending from the medulla to the second lumbar vertebra ; its lower end tapers to a point. Before its ...
-Cranial Nerves
Twelve nerves arise from the brain on either side of the middle line, and pass out through openings in the skull. With the exception of the two first and the ...
-Spinal Nerves
Thirty-one spinal nerves pass out on each side of the spinal cord through the intervertebral foramina. They correspond in name with the bones with which they ...
-Reflex Action Of The Spinal Cord
The spinal cord is the medium by which motor and sensory impressions are conducted to and from the brain. It receives impressions from all parts of the body by ...
-Spinal Nerves: Anterior And Posterior Primary Division
Posterior Primary Division. The posterior primary division of the spinal nerves nearly all divide into internal and external branches, which supply the muscles ...
-Spinal Nerves: Cervical Plexus
This plexus is formed by the upper four cervical nerves. The lower three each divide into an ascending and descending branch, which, joining together, form the ...
-Spinal Nerves: Brachial Plexus
This plexus is formed by the union of the four lower cervical and first dorsal nerves. It extends from the lower part of the neck to the upper part of the ...
-Spinal Nerves: Lumbar and Sacral Plexuses
Lumbar Plexus This plexus is formed by the union of the first three and part of the fourth lumbar nerves. It lies in the substance of the psoas muscle in front ...
-The Nervous System: Sympathetic System
From the gangliated cord which lies at each side of the spinal column an external and internal series of branches are given off. FIG 29. Chain of Sympathetic ...

Part VI: Chapter VI: The Upper Limb

-The Upper Limb Bones
Clavicle, or collar-bone | form shoulder Scapula, shoulder-blade | girdle. Humerus, bones of upper arm. Ulna and Radius, bones of forearm. Carpal, bones of ...
-The Arm
The humerus is a long cylindrical bone. The superior head is round and covered with cartilage; just below it is the anatomical neck ; further down, below the ...
-The Forearm
The articulation of the superior heads of the ulna and radius with the humerus forms the elbow-joint. The ulna is an irregularly shaped bone. The upper head ...
-The Hand
There are twenty-seven bones in the hand. Eight small bones form the wrist, two rows of four bones each. Counting from the thumb, the bones of the first row ...
-Ligaments Of The Upper Limb
The acromio-clavicular ligament joins the acromion process to the clavicle. The coraco-clavicular ligament joins the coracoid process to the clavicle. The ...
-The Upper Limb Muscles
The muscles chiefly concerned in producing movements of the joints of the upper limb are as follows : Shoulder. Flexion : pectoralis major, anterior fibres of ...
-Table Of Muscles Of Upper Limb
Table Of Muscles Of Upper Limb Name. Position. Origin. Insertion. Action. Nerve Supply. Latissimus dorsi. Lumbar and lower part of dorsal regions. Crest of ...
-Upper Limb Fascia
The deep fascia which binds together the muscles of the shoulder is very strong and tendinous. The deep fascia of the arm is thin over the biceps and dense ...
-Bloodvessels Of Upper Limb: Arteries
The right subclavian artery arises from the bifurcation of the innominate artery. The left subclavian, artery arises from the arch of the aorta. In both cases ...
-Bloodvessels Of Upper Limb: Veins
The deep veins accompany their respective arteries, and are called by their names. The superficial are the following : the radial veins on the outer border ; ...
-Bloodvessels Of Upper Limb: Lymphatics
The superficial lymphatics of the upper limb begin in the fingers ; two lymphatic vessels ascend from the palmar surface of each finger and form an arch in the ...
-Chief Nerves Of The Upper Limb
The upper limb is supplied by nerves from the brachial plexus. Above the clavicle the fifth, sixth and seventh nerves send branches to adjacent muscles. The ...
-Massage Of The Hand
Hand. The operator should stand or sit facing the patient, whose arm must be supported, if sitting, with the elbow on a table ; if in bed, with the elbow ...
-Massage Of The Forearm
The Forearm. 1. Effleurage. The forearm, somewhat flexed to relax the muscles, rests on and is supported by one hand, while the other makes straight, even, ...
-Massage Of The Arm
The Arm. 1. The inner side is stroked with the open hand, the thumb separated from the fingers. The outer side in the same way. Then, with flat hand, from the ...
-Massage Of The Shoulder
Shoulder. 1. Friction with three fingers round the top of the humerus, beginning well in the armpit in front and finishing well in the armpit at the back. 2.

Part VII: Chapter VII: The Lower Limb

-The Lower Limb Bones
Innominate, or Hip-bone. Femur, Thigh-bone, Patella, Kneecap. Tibia, Shin-bone. Fibula, Splint-bone. Tarsal, Bones of foot. Metatarsal, Bones of foot.
-The Leg
The bones of the leg are the tibia and fibula ; the tibia is the inner and larger bone, and articulates at its upper extremity by two tuberosities with the ...
-The Foot
There are twenty-six bones in the foot. Seven form the tarsus, or instep : 1. Os calcis, 4. Cuboid, 2. Astragalus, 5. Inner, or first cuneiform, 3. Scaphoid, 6.
-Ligaments Of The Lower Limb
The ligaments of the hip-joint are : 1. Capsular, 3. Cotyloid, 2. Ligamentum teres, 4. Transverse. The capsular surrounds the joint : it is attached to the ...
-Muscles Of The Lower Limb
Muscles Of The Lower Limb Name. Position. Origin. Insertion. Action. Nerve Supply. Gluteus maximus. Back of pelvis. Largest and most superficial of three ...
-The Superficial Fascia
The superficial fascia in the gluteal region is laden with fat, especially in females. It becomes tough and elastic over the tuberosity of the ischium. On the ...
-Bloodvessels Of The Lower Limbs: Arteries
The external iliac artery, one of the two divisions of the common iliac artery, is the beginning in the abdomen of the main artery which supplies the lower ...
-Bloodvessels Of The Lower Limbs: Veins
The veins of the lower limb, like those of the upper limb, are arranged in a superficial and deep set. The deep veins accompany their respective arteries, and ...
-Bloodvessels Of The Lower Limbs: Lymphatics
There is a group of lymphatic glands in the popliteal space, two or three at each side of the popliteal artery ; they receive the deep lymphatics from the leg, ...
-Chief Nerves Of The Lower Limbs
The anterior crural nerve arises from the lumbar plexus, and enters the thigh behind Poupart's ligament between the psoas and iliacus muscles. It divides into ...
-Massage Of The Lower Limb
The operator faces the patient. The movements are the same as on the arm ; some difference is made in the mode of application to suit the shape of the limb.
-Massage Of The Ankle
The Ankle. 1. Friction with thumbs on tarsal and round ankle bones. 2. Effleurage. 3. Kneading with heel of hand. 4. Passive movements. With one hand the lower ...
-Massage Of The Leg
1. With the whole palmar surface of the hand held length-wise, effleurage is applied to the inner and outer aspects, and to the back with the hand held ...
-Massage Of The Knee
The Knee. 1. Effleurage. 2. Friction with thumb round patella, beginning below ; many small circles are made overlapping each other till the corresponding ...
-Massage Of The Thigh
1. The inner and outer aspects are effleuraged with the open hand, the thumb on top and fingers underneath, thus working on the muscles at the back at the same ...
-Massage Of The Hip Joint
1. Effleurage. 2. Friction with fingers.. 3. Pétrissage with heel of hand. 4. Effleurage. It is not necessary that all these movements should be used at one ...

Part VIII: Chapter VIII and IX: The Trunk

-The Trunk Bones
Spinal Column. Ribs. Sternum. Pelvis. The spinal column is composed of thirty-three vertebrae : 7 Cervical (neck). 12 Dorsal (back). 5 Lumbar (loins). 5 Sacral ...
-The Trunk Ligaments
The vertebrae are bound together and the column strengthened by several ligaments. The supraspinous ligament, a thick band which connects the points of the ...
-The Trunk Muscles
The upper limb is attached to the back of the trunk by five muscles, the trapezius and the latissimus dorsi, which are attached to the scapula and to the ...
-Muscles Of The Thorax
Muscles Of The Thorax Name. Position. Origin. Insertion. Action. Nerve Supply. Pectoralis major. Upper and fore part of chest, and in front of axilla. Anterior ...
-Muscles Of The Abdomen
Muscles Of The Abdomen Name. Position. Origin. Insertion. Action. Nerve Supply. Obliquus externus abdominis. Side and front of abdomen. Eight lower ribs by ...
-Muscles Of The Back
Muscles Of The Back Name. Position. Origin. Insertion. Action. Nerve Supply. Rhomboid minor Lies obliquely on back from last cervical vertebra to root of ...
-The Trunk Fascia
The vertebral fascia is strong and thin ; it confines the muscles of the spine and head in a hollow between the spinous processes of the dorsal vertebrae and ...
-The Lungs
The lungs are two spongy organs quite distinct from each other, placed on either side of the middle line. A large portion of them is occupied by the bronchial ...
-Respiration
Respiration is carried on by means of the Mouth. Trachea. Nose. Bronchi. Larynx. Lungs. An adult breathes from sixteen to eighteen times per minute, and ...
-The Heart
The heart is a hollow muscular organ, situated behind the sternum and costal cartilages, and between the lungs, two-thirds being on the left of the middle line.
-The Mediastinum
The mediastinum is the space in the middle of the chest between the two pleurae. It extends from the sternum to the spine, and contains all the viscera in the ...
-The Trunk Arteries
The part of the aorta which is contained within the thorax is named the ascending aorta, the arch of the aorta, and the descending aorta. The visceral branches ...
-The Trunk Veins
The superior vena cava, which returns to the heart all the venous blood from the upper part of the body, is formed by the union of the two innominate veins ...
-The Trunk Lymphatics
Intercostal glands are on each side of the spine, along the heads of the ribs, which empty into both ducts. Several glands lie between the sternum and ...
-The Trunk Nerves
The phrenic nerve is the most important branch of the cervical plexus, as it is the motor nerve of the diaphragm. It enters the thorax behind the subclavian ...
-The Pelvis and The Abdomen
The pelvis is divided into true and false. The false pelvis is. the abdomen proper, the part that is enclosed in front only by muscle and fascia. The true ...
-The Stomach
The stomach is a muscular and membranous bag situated one-fourth in the epigastric region, and three-fourths in the left hypochondriac region. It is about 10 ...
-The Colon And The Rectum
The colon, the second part, extends up through the right lumbar region, and is here called the ascending colon. At the under surface of the right lobe of the ...
-The Liver
The liver is the largest gland in the body ; it fills the greater part of the right hypochondriac region, extends through the epigastric and slightly into the ...
-The Gall-bladder
The gall-bladder is a pear-shaped sac lying behind the right lobe of the liver, 4 inches long, 1.5 inches broad, and holds 1.5 ounces. The fundus comes beyond ...
-The Pancreas and The Spleen
The pancreas is an elongated gland lying across the posterior wall of the abdomen, behind the stomach, on a level with the first lumbar vertebra, one end in ...
-The Kidneys
The kidneys are situated opposite to the last dorsal and upper two or three lumbar vertebrae ; they lie in the hypochondriac and epigastric regions, and the ...
-The Ureters. The Urethra. The ovaries. The bladder
The ureters are muscular ducts, about 15 inches long, and the size of a pencil. They extend downwards and inwards, and at each side pierce the base of the ...
-Peritoneum. The Gastro-colic Omentum. The Mesentery
Peritoneum. The peritoneum is a serous membrane which lines the walls of the abdominal cavity and invests nearly all its viscera. The kidneys and ureters are ...
-The Alimentary Canal
The alimentary canal consists of the Mouth. Stomach. Pharynx. Small intestine. sophagus. Large intestine. Secretions from various glands are poured into it, by ...
-The Alimentary Canal Arteries
At the fourth lumbar vertebra the abdominal aorta divides into the common iliac arteries ; opposite the lumbo-sacral joint they divide into the external and ...
-The Alimentary Canal Veins
The inferior vena cava is formed at the fifth lumbar vertebra by the union of the common iliac veins, and by its tributaries collects all the venous blood from ...
-Deep Lymphatic Glands
There are chains of glands in relation to the iliac arteries, aorta and inferior vena cava, which resolve themselves into four or five trunks, and join the ...
-Massage of The Chest
The operator may stand at either side, facing the patient. 1. The hands are placed on the chest, spread out over the pectoral muscles, the ends of the fingers ...
-Massage Of The Abdomen
Massage of the abdomen can be done equally well standing at the right or left side of the abdomen. It is of advantage to the pupils to practise at both sides.
-Massage Of The Liver
The Liver. 1. Firm friction all over the region of the liver with whole palmar surface of hand, first placed over the epigastrium and encroaching on left ...
-Massage Of The Stomach
The Stomach. 1. The thumb of the right hand is placed lengthwise and obliquely in the ^-shaped space between the ribs, and between the sternum and umbilicus ...
-Massaging The Colon. Movements for Constipation
Movements for Constipation. Before the manipulations are commenced, the fingers should be passed gently over the abdomen, and any inequality of the surface, ...
-Massage. Enteroptosis
Enteroptosis. Much relief may be given to patients suffering from the dragging sensation which accompanies prolapse of the contents of the abdomen by the ...
-Massage. Chronic Diarrhoea
Chronic Diarrhoea. The movements used in chronic diarrhoea are the same as those used for constipation, but not so deep. The object in both cases is to restore ...
-Massage Of The Ovaries
The Ovaries. Massage is ordered over the region of the ovaries and uterus to assist in breaking down adhesions, and sometimes to relieve pain. The knees are ...
-Massage Of The Uterus
The Uterus. Pressure can be made on the uterus by spanning the hand across just above the crest of the pubes, the fingers on one side and the thumb on the ...
-Massage Of The Abdoment Benefits
Massage of the Abdomen : 1. Stimulates liver and gall-bladder. 2. Aids digestion in stomach and intestines. 3. Relieves constipation by increasing peristaltic ...
-Massage In Case Of The Catamenia
The Catamenia. Abdominal massage must be discontinued while the catamenia are present. In general massage, if the patient has habitually a normal flow, and ...
-Massage Of The Back
The patient lies face downward if possible. Some patients cannot, for one reason or another, assume this position ; others have a rooted objection to do so. In ...

Part IX: Chapter X: The Head, Face and Neck

-The Head, Face, And Neck
The bones of the head and face are called the skull. It is divided into the cranium and face. In the cranium are eight bones ; 1 Frontal (forehead). 2 Parietal ...
-The Neck
The Neck. The vertebrae of the neck are seven in number. The two upper articular processes of the first vertebra are concave, and articulate with the occipital ...
-The Cervical Fascia
The cervical fascia not only covers the soft parts of the neck collectively, but forms separate sheaths for the muscles vessels, and glands. It commences as a ...
-Some Muscles Of The Head; Face, And Neck
Some Muscles Of The Head; Face, And Neck Name. Position. Origin. Insertion. Action. Nerve Supply. Occipito- frontalis. From occiput to eyebrows, central ...

Part X: Chapter XI: General Massage

-General Massage
It is not necessary, in giving general massage, to use all the movements that have been learned. In manipulating, say, a paralyzed limb more movements are ...
-Massage: Obesity
In general massage for obesity all the movements are characterized by pressure, and may, broadly speaking, come under the head of pétrissage, but they are done ...
-Massage: Insomnia
If sleeplessness is caused by cold feet, as is often the case, massage of feet and legs to knees, fifteen minutes each, after the patient has retired for the ...
-Massage: The Weir-Mitchell Treatment
This treatment consists of isolation, rest, excessive feeding, massage, and electricity. The two latter are given to counteract the ill-effects which would ...
-Massage: Chorea
This is another disease for which the rest cure is beneficial ; the patient is kept in bed, and regularly fed, and has massage twice daily from fifteen to ...

Part XI: Chapter XII and XIII: Massage of Special Regions

-Massage Of Special Regions: The Head
The operator stands in front, but rather to one side of the patient, who is seated. The head is steadied with one hand, the fingers of the other hand are drawn ...
-Massage Of Special Regions: The Face
Supra-orbital Neuralgia. 1. The thumb is placed on the supra-orbital notch on the -affected side, and the supra-orbital nerve is pressed against the bone ; ...
-Massage of the Wry Neck (Torticollis)
In wry neck the head is flexed to one side by contraction of muscles ; the face is rotated to the opposite side, and the chin is tilted. The sterno-mastoid is, ...
-Massage Of The Throat
Laryngitis. 1. The thumb is placed well up under the jaw at one side of the larynx, and the index-finger opposite to it Fig. 96. Kneading the Sterno-Mastoid.
-Massage Of The Spinal Curvature
The curvatures with which the masseuse has to deal are : Lateral (scoliosis). Posterior (kyphosis). Anterior (lordosis). Angular curvature, being a disease of ...
-Massage: Flat-Foot
Flat-foot is a sinking of the instep, with flattening and broadening of the sole of the foot. Two strong arches, a longitudinal and a transverse, are formed by ...
-Massage: Knock-Knee
In knock-knee, when the patient stands the knees are close together and the legs and feet are spread out, forming an angle with the knees. 1. Effleurage of the ...
-Massage: Writer's Cramp
Writer's cramp or, properly speaking, occupation neurosis is a complaint to which writers, telegraphists, knitters, painters, pianists, violinists, watchmakers, ...
-Massage Of The Sciatica
The position of the patient and operator depends on the condition of the former. The patient may from pain be quite unable to move, and, if lying on the back, ...
-Massage: Recent Sprains
It is important that the mechanism of all principal joints should be studied, as they give a great deal of work to the masseuse, and her success in the ...
-Massage: Synovitis Of The Knee
In synovitis of the knee there is very extensive swelling, because of the large synovial membrane, and many bursae. The membrane lines the capsular ligament, ...
-Massage: Chronic Joint Sprains Or Stiffness From Injury
In chronic joint troubles, such as old sprains or stiffness from any injury, the local circulation and secretion are decreased, therefore the joint is ...
-Massage: Lawn-Tennis Arm
Lawn-Tennis Arm. 1. Effleurage. 2. Light circular movements over back of forearm, avoiding tender spots. 3. Passive movements. There is sometimes a soft ...
-Massage: Recent Fracture
Recent Fracture. If the limb is in splints, they must be removed with care to avoid displacing the fragments ; the same precaution applies to sand-bags and ...
-Massage: Fractured Patella
Fractured Patella. In this case care must be taken not to draw the fragments apart, or to stretch the connecting fibres while striving by manipulations to ...
-Massage: Pott's and Colles' Fracture
Pott's Fracture. In this the lower end of the fibula is broken and there is dislocation of the foot outward. The work is commenced, as in a bad sprain, by ...
-Massage: Other Cases
Phlegmasia Dolens. Massage is given for the dema and woodiness that are left after this disease. Great care is necessary to give the movements evenly and ...

Part XII: Chapter XIV: Massage of Children

-Massage Of Children: Acute Anterior Poliomyelitis Or Infantile Paralysis
The masseuse has to do with paralysis, atrophy of muscles, and deformities that result from this disease, but it is interesting to know a little about the ...

Part XIII: Chapter XV: The Nauheim Or Schott Treatment

-The Nauheim Or Schott Treatment
This treatment, consisting of effervescing saline baths and resistive exercises, is frequently used in conjunction with massage. Like massage, it should never ...
-The Nauheim Or Schott Treatment: Arm Movements
1. The operator faces the patient. The arms are stretched forward on a level with the shoulders, palms meeting in front ; they are taken out sideways on the ...
-The Nauheim Or Schott Treatment: Leg Movements
1. The thigh is flexed. Resistance by hand placed above knee, and, on the return, under sole of foot. 2. The leg is fully extended forwards, then backwards, ...
-The Nauheim Or Schott Treatment: Trunk Movements
1. Operator standing at side. Forward flexion resisted by hand on sternum. Extension resisted by hand between shoulders. 2. Lateral flexion resisted by hand ...
-The Nauheim Or Schott Treatment: Baths
A course of eighteen or twenty-one baths are taken, generally in sets of three, with a day's rest between each set. Sometimes only two are taken between the ...

Part XIV: Chapter XVI: Bandaging

-Bandaging
A masseuse who is not a trained nurse should take pains to become expert in bandaging. What is required of her is that she should know how to apply the roller- ...
-Bandaging: Arms
To Bandage The Thumb in Case of Sprain. A bandage 1 to 2 yards long and 0.75 inch wide. A couple of turns are first made round the wrist to fix the bandage.
-Bandaging: Legs
To Bandage the Lower Limb. A bandage is applied to the great toe in the same way as to the thumb. To Bandage the Foot. Bandage 2.5 inches wide. Extend the leg ...
-Applying Bandages after Massage of Fractures
To Apply Bandages after Massage of Fractures. The bandages are not removed till the surgeon so orders, as there is difference of opinion as to when a fractured ...

Part XV: Appendices

-New Terms Of Ligaments
New Terms Of Muscles, Etc., Used In This Book. Ligaments of the Spine And Skull. New Terms. Old Terms. Anterior longitudinal. Anterior common. Posterior ...
-New Terms Of Muscles
Muscles Of The Trunk. NEW TERMS. OLD TERMS. Levator scapulae. Levator anguli scapulae. Serratus posterior inferior. Serratus posticus inferior. Serratus ...
-New Terms Of Nerves
Nerves. Head And Face. NEW TERMS. OLD TERMS. Acoustic nerve. Auditory. Vagus nerve. Pneumogastric. Accessory nerve. Spinal accessory. Internal ramus. Accessory ...
-Glossary: A-C
Abdo'men. Lower chamber of trunk. Abduc'tion. Movement of a limb from middle line of body. Acetab'ulum. Vinegar-cup. Acro'mion. Process which terminates the ...
-Glossary: D-L
Del'toid. Triangular muscle like the Greek letter A (delta). Di'aphragm (dy'afram). The midriff, partition between the thorax and abdomen. Dor'sum. The back.
-Glossary: M-O
Ma'lar. Pertaining to the cheek. Malle'olus. The ankle. Resembles a hammer. Manu'brium. A handle, upper part of the sternum. Mas'sage (mas'sahzh). Manipulation ...
-Glossary: P-R
Pal'ate. The roof of the mouth. Pal'pebra. The eyelid. Pan'creas. A gland, the sweetbread of animals. Papil'lae. Minute eminences on the surface of the body.
-Glossary: S-Z
Sacrum. Triangular bone above the coccyx. Saphe'nous. Applied to two superficial veins and nerves of the lower limb and to an opening in the thigh. Sarcolem'ma.
-Abridged List Of Veterinary Works
PUBLISHED BY BAILLIÈRE, TINDALL COX. BANHAM'S Table of Veterinary Posology and Therapeutics, with Weights, Measures, etc., for the use of Students and ...







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