-As defective nutrition is one of the principal causes of consumption, the improvement of the patient's nutrition is one of the most essential features of the treatment of this disease. In order to accomplish this, attention must first be given to improvement of the digestion. If the patient is suffering with any of the various forms of dyspepsia, he must receive such treatment for the same as has been already described in the section on "Diseases of the Digestive Organs." This is a matter of very great importance, though it is often overlooked, the supposition being that the stomach disorder depends upon the disease of the lungs rather than the contrary, which is really the case. The diet of the patient should first consist of such food as he can best digest. In many cases, milk and eggs with well-cooked grains and a small allowance of fruit, constitute the dietary best adapted to the condition of both the lungs and the stomach. Dr. Salisbury, of Cleveland, who has a peculiar theory regarding consumption, believing that it originates from the products of fermentation in the stomach, requires his patients to abstain from the use of fruit and sweet and starchy foods altogether, and to depend almost exclusively upon lean meat with a very small allowance of bread. He requires his patients to take several pounds of beef steak or other lean meat daily. Ho claims very extraordinary results from his plan of treatment. His plan differs from that which we have followed for a number of years in but the one particular of diet. We have never thought it necessary to confine patients to an exclusively nitrogenous diet, and believe there are several evils which may arise from this course, which are perhaps as great as those growing out of the disease itself. We have also obtained by our plan results as remarkable as any claimed by Dr. Salisbury. We shall have to receive considerable more evidence than has yet been produced to convince us of the necessity of depriving consumptive patients of fruits and grains, and confining them wholly to flesh diet. The daily employment of massage, and inunction at least two or three times a week, together with daily sponging with salt water, are excellent means for stimulating nutrition. To these measures should be added, when possible, a sun bath daily from half an hour to two hours in length, according to the patient's strength and the frequent use of electricity in the form of general faradization.