Bandages are made of cotton, cotton flannel, ordinary drilling, or of very thin, loose muslin, according to the purpose for which they are to bo used. In the application of bandages to fractured limbs great care should be taken to apply them with even pressure, and not so tight as to interrupt the circulation of the blood. Figs. 365 and 366 represent the roller bandage and the mode of applying it, and Fig. 367 the appearance of the limb after the bandage has been properly applied. The width of bandages varies from one to three or four inches. In making them, care should be taken to remove all loose threads from the edges.

Fig. 365. Roller Bandage on Foot.

Fig. 365. Roller Bandage on Foot.

Fig. 366. Roller Bandage on Shin.

Fig. 366. Roller Bandage on Shin.

Fig. 367. Roller Bandage Properly Applied To Leg.

Fig. 367. Roller Bandage Properly Applied To Leg.

The plaster-of-Paris bandage is very useful in the treatment of many fractures. It is made by rubbing into a cloth bandage with loose meshes dry plaster-of-Paris, as much being rubbed in as can bo held by the cloth, the bandage being rolled as the plaster is rubbed in. In using, the bandage should be placed in water for two or three minutes and then applied to the limb as rapidly as possible.

Bandages saturated with flour starch are sometimes employed. Glue, shellac, silicate of soda, or soluble glass, and parafine, have also been used in a similar manner. The advantage of bandages of this kind is that they obviate the necessity for splints-themselves forming most perfect splints-giving the parts equal pressure on all sides. In case it is necessary to remove the bandage occasionally for the purpose of giving the limb attention, it may be easily done by cutting open one side and springing the sides so as to allow the bandage to be slipped off the limb.