Club-Foot is a deformity surgically known as talipes, of which there are several distinct varieties, as shown in Figs. 419 to 423. Fig. 419 represents a form of the disease known as talipes equinus. Fig 420 represents talipes valgus, or splay foot. Fig. 421 illustrates talipes varus, the most common form of club-foot. Figs. 422 and 423 represent two forms of talipes calcaneus.

Fig. 419. Club Foot - Talipes Equlnus.

Fig. 419. Club Foot - Talipes Equlnus.

Fig. 420. Club Foot - Talipes Valgus.

Fig. 420. Club Foot - Talipes Valgus.

Club-foot generally exists at birth, but is sometimes acquired in childhood. In the majority of cases club-foot) requires treatment by a skillful surgeon, but much can be done by the nurse toward obviating these difficulties, if attention is given to the condition of the feet at birth. If they are found to be deformed as shown in Fig. 421, which is the most common of all the deformities of the feet, the nurse should take pains to turn the feet gently into a proper position by pressure of the hand. This should be done several times a day, and if persevering efforts are made in this direction a cure may often be effected.

Fig. 421. Club Foot - Talipes Varus.

Fig. 421. Club Foot - Talipes Varus.

Fig. 422. Club Foot - Talipes Calcaneus.

Fig. 422. Club Foot - Talipes Calcaneus.

Fig. 423. Club Foot - Talipes Calcaneus.

Fig. 423. Club Foot - Talipes Calcaneus 2.

When the condition becomes established by long continuance, it is often necessary to employ some form of apparatus in treatment. Figs. 424 and 425 represent shoes and braces intended to be worn in certain forms of club-foot

Fig. 424. Shoe for Talipes Calcanens.

Fig. 424. Shoe for Talipes Calcanens.

Fig. 425. Shoe for Talipes Varus.

Fig. 425. Shoe for Talipes Varus.