The treatment of this disease by means of opiates, large doses of bromide of potash, chloral, etc., is very often unsuccessful, especially in severe cases. The best treatment consists in keeping the patient as quiet as possible, applying ice or cold pours to the head. The cold shower bath may be employed with advantage when the fever is high and cerebral congestion very great. When the patient refuses to eat, his strength may be sustained by the use of nutritive injections. There is usually such a high degree of inflammation of the stomach that food will not be digested if eaten; and it would probably be well to adopt this plan of feeding in nearly all cases. The patient should be kept in a darkened room, and guarded against all avoidable disturbances. Great exhaustion results from the violent muscular exertion generally made by the patient; these should be restrained as much as possible. When a sufficient number of attendants cannot be secured to hold the patient in bed, the arms and feet may be tied together by means of wide bands, as towels or sheets, thus rendering the patient much more easily controllable. When necessary, the straight jacket, shown in Fig. 323, which is frequently used in insane asylums, may be employed.

Fig. 323. Straight Jacket

Fig. 323. Straight Jacket

In the effort to reform persons who have been addicted to drink, the idea should not be entertained that any substitute for liquor can be found. Anything which would be a substitute for its effects would be equally as bad as the liquor itself. The much advertised "Cinchona Cure" is an unmitigated fraud. As prepared by Mr. D'Unger, the professed discoverer, it is simply an alcholic liquor, flavored with "red bark," one of the varieties of the Cinchona tree, from which quinine is obtained. Prof.

Earle, physician to the Washingtonian "Inebriates' Home," in Chicago, has recently exposed the matter in a Chicago medical journal. He has traced the after-history of a number of drunkards whom D'Unger publicly claimed to have cured; but nearly all of whom have since been under Dr.

Earle's treatment at the "Inebriate's Home." Not a single one was in the least degree improved by the Cinchona Cure." Some of his mixtures contain as high as twenty-four per cent of alcohol, a larger proportion than is found in ale, or most wines. Prof. Earle gives it as his opinion that the "Cinchona Cure" has made more drunkards in Chicago within the past year than any one of the saloons in that city.