Rest in bed with the head and shoulders elevated. Mental and physical quiet. Restrain cough as much as possible, as it greatly aggravates the hemorrhage. Give patient iced-water to drink and small bits of ice to swallow. Apply ice compresses over chest, and every fifteen minutes make hot applications between the shoulders by means of hot bricks, fomentations, or hot bags. Take care to keep the trunk and limbs dry, and apply heat to the extremities. Frozen compresses may bo applied thus: Mix, in an ordinary large milk-pan, equal parts of pounded ice and salt at least two inches deep. Mix quickly and cover. Place the pan upon a compress of cotton or linen of four or five thicknesses wrung out of iced-water as dry as possible. In a few seconds the compress will be frozen. Apply at once, and cover with a dry flannel. A good means of applying continuous cold is by means of the syphon syringe, as shown in Fig. 310.

Fig. 310. Applying cold to chest for hemorrhage of lungs.

Fig. 310. Applying cold to chest for hemorrhage of lungs.

The upper vessel is filled with water containing two or three pounds of salt to the gallon, and a quantity of ice. The current of the ice-cold mixture is started by means of the tabs upon the sides of the bag, the stop-cock on the lower tube being closed. When the bag is sufficiently full, the stop-cock is opened sufficiently to allow the fluid in the bag to pass out at the same rate that it runs in When the water has nearly run out of the upper vessel, that which has run into the lower vessel should be put into the upper one and a new supply of ice, or ice and salt, added. By this means an intense degree of cold may be kept up for hours without wetting the patient or giving him any inconvenience whatever. Good results are also obtained by employing cold enemas. The temperature should be as low as the patient will bear. It is customary to add a little vinegar to the rectal injections, though we think the addition is unnecessary. Common salt is a remedy popularly reputed to be of value in these cases. The usual dose is a teaspoonful of finely-powdered salt taken dry. The most useful internal remedy, however, is the inhalation of a solution of alum or tannin. The proportion should be 5-10 grs. to the ounce of water, and the solution should be inhaled by means of an atomizer. Junod's boot and ligation of the limbs are remedies of value in hemorrhage from the lungs as well as in congestion. The diet should be the same as directed for congestion, meat, stimulants, hot drinks, and stimulating condiments being carefully avoided. Little food should be taken during the attack, and for a day or two after. The patient's mind should be quieted by the assurance that, in all probability, he will recover, and it may even be suggested to him that the effect of the hemorrhage may be beneficial. We have never failed to relieve cases of hemorrhage by the employment of this plan of treatment.