The great danger of this disease is that the pupil will become permanently contracted, through adhesion to the cornea or to the crystalline lens. The best means of preventing this is dilatation with atropia. A drop or two of the solution of atropia mentioned before should be applied to the eye once in five minutes for a half hour at a time, three or four times a day, by means of a medicine dropper, Fig. 446, or a camels hair brush.

Fig. 446. Medicine Dropper.

Fig. 446. Medicine Dropper.

The lower lid should be turned down and the solution dropped into the pocket formed between the edge and the eyeball. The eye should be carefully protected from light by confining the patient in a dark room if the inflammation is very severe. The well eye, as well as the weak one, should be given perfect rest, as it cannot be used without irritating the other. Hot fomentations or the hot spray, as hot as can be borne, should be applied over the closed eye one hour at a time, from three to six times a day, according to the severity of the case. In some cases, when the pain is very severe, fomentations should be kept up continuously, until the pain is permanently relieved. When the eye has received a severe injury, the application of fomentations is an excellent means of preventing iritis. Wet-sheet packs and vapor baths may often be used with advantage in treating cases of severe inflammation of the eye, being excellent derivative agents.

Persons suffering with chronic iritis should carefully protect the eye from a bright light by means of blue or London smoke glasses, and should avoid taxing the eyes severely in any way. The use of tobacco and alcoholic liquors should be particularly avoided, as also exposure to the irritation of tobacco-smoke.