Ager Naturae

See Uterus.

Ageratum

(α, non, and Ageratum 244 senectus,) because its flowers preserve their beauty a long time. It is also named balsamita minor; costus hortorum minor;

Sweet Maudlin

"Maudlin Tansey. It is the Achillea ageratum of Linnaeus. Sp. Pi. 1264.

The other species of achillea are the A. litrata Lin. 1267, the true genepi of the shops; the A. millefolium Lin. 1267; A. moschata (odorata, Lin. 1268); A./itar-mica, Lin. 1266. These agree in a pleasing smell, and a bitterish taste, resembling the costmary and tansey. Their virtues, though inconsiderable, are best extracted by water. To this, however, the ptarmica is an exception; for the smell of the flowers is nauseous; the taste of the root acrid and pungent. The former species are used in stomach complaints; the last as an errhine and a sialagogue, to relieve the tooth-ach, and as a remedy for palsy.

Ageratus Lapis

(Ageratus, common). A stone used by coblers to polish women's shoes. It is ridiculously said to discuss, and to be gently astringent. If it possesses any such virtues, it probably contains iron, a supposition countenanced by its being used in dyeing.

Age Vita

The name of an antidote, rather supposed to be called jugis vita, long, or continual life. It is a medicated wine, made with galangal root, long and white pepper, sage, ginger, cinnamon, saffron, and cloves, boiled in wine.

Agglomeratio

(From ad and glomero, to roll together). The rolling or mixing together two or more substances into one mass.

Agglutinatio

(From ad and glutino, to solder together,) agglutination. Reunion, sticking together: so healers are agglutinants.

--------------------------- - pilorum. Reducing the hair of the eye-lids that grow inward, to their natural order, by any glutinous matter on a probe.

Agglutinants

A class of medicines .which united wounds, or were supposed to have this effect. They consisted of substances which contained gluten, and were thought capable of supplying that portion of the blood whose effects on wounds were sufficiently obvious. They are now known to be useless. If any such internal medicine exists, it is gum arabic, in a very large dose taken daily for a considerable timer

The other agglutinants are merely nutritious, except the olibanum, which acts in humoral asthmas on a dif-fercnt principle.

Aggregatae Glaxdulae

(From aggrego, to assemble together). Small glands, supposed to be lodged in the cellular coat of the intestines next to the villous; but as they do not appear in an uninjected gut, many anatomists suspect them only to be little bits of separated wax.

Aggregatum

(From the same,) an aggregate. A body resulting from the union of many others which are smaller, of which the whole sum is the aggregate.

Aggregatus

(From the same). In botany it is an epithet applied to those parts of plants, which are so united that they cannot be separated without injury to the economy of the whole.