Agriocastanum

(From Agriocastanum 275 wild, and the chesnut). See Bulbooastanum. Agriocinara, (from wild, and artichoke). See Cinara sylvestris.

Agriococcimela

(From Agriococcimela 279 wild, a berry, and an apple-tree). See Prunus syi Vestris

Agriomela

(From Agriomela 282 wild, and appletree). See Malus sylvestris.

Agrion Agriomela 284 wild).

See Peuce danum.

Agriophyllon (Agriomela 285 and leaf).

Agrioriganum

(Agrioriganum 287 and marjoram ). See Origanum Anglicum.

Agrioselinum

(Agrioselinum 289 and parsley).

See Hipposelinum.

Agripalma Gallis

(Agripalma Gallis 291 and palmtree). See Cardiaca.

Agrippae

Children born with the feet foremost are so called from Agrippa, who was named ab agro partu, from his difficult birth. These births, though reckoned preternatural, are often more safe and easy than the natural. See Praesentatio. It is the name also of an ointment described by Nicolaus.

Agrium

An impure fossil alkali: the purer sort was called halmyrhaga.

Agrom

A disease of the tongue not uncommon in India; in which it becomes extremely rough and chapped. They relieve it by drinking a chalybeate fluid, or the juice of a large species of mint; or chewing the black-seeded basilica.

Agrostis

See Bryonia alba.

Agrumina

Quasi agriomina, (from Agrumina 293 wild,) onions, leeks. See Cepa, and Porrum.

Agrypnia

(From α, neg. and Agrypnia 294 sleep). See

Pervigilium.

Agrypnocoma

(Agrypnocoma 295 without sleep, and lethargus). See Coma vigil.

Aguara Quiya

See Solanum hortense.

Ague

See Intermittent.

Ague Drops

This is a medicine sold for the cure of agues, which is evidently a solution of arsenic in water. The solution is saturated, and the dose is equal to about the twentieth part of a grain. It is a powerful and useful medicine, and, in proper hands, not injurious.