Cauledon

(because it breaks like Cauledon 1865 a stalk). A species of fracture, when the bone is broken transversely so as not to cohere.

Caulias

(From Caulias 1866 a stalk). An epithet for that juice of the asafoetida plant which flows from the stalk, by way of distinction from that which flows from the root, and is called rizias. Its stalk is styled caulos.

Caulis

And Caulos, (from kalah, a Chaldean term). The stalk. See Caudex. It is a name also for both the penis and vagina; and in corn and grass it is called the blade. It is a name for a cabbage or colewort. See Brassica sativa.

Caulis florida. See Cauliflower.

Caulodes

(From Caulodes 1868 cabbage). See Brast sica.

Cauma

(From Cauma 1869 to burn). The heat of the atmosphere; or of the body in a fever.

Caunga

See Areca.

Causis

(From Causis 1872 uro, to burn). See Ambusta.

Causcdes Febris

(From Causcdes Febris 1873 to burn). See

Febris ardens.

Causoma

(From the same). In Hippocrates signifies a burning heat and inflammation.

Caustica

Caustics, (from Caustica 1874 to burn). See Escharotica.

Causus

(From Causus 1876 uro,to burn). See Ardens febris and Dipsas.

Ca Van

Dicta Thora parou. See Cajan.

Caverna

(From cavus, hollow). A cavern. See also Pudendum Muliebre.

Caviarium

(From caviar). It is the pickled roe of the sturgeon.

Cavicula

And Cavilla, (from cavus). See Astragalus, and also Cuneiforme os.

Cavitasinnomina

"Ta,(from the same). See Auricula.

Cayenne

Ca Yan. See Piper Indicum.

Cayutana Luzonis

See Fagara major.

Cazabi

SeeCassada.

Ceanothos

(From Ceanothos 1878 because it pricks at the extreme parts). See Carduus haemorrhoidalis..

Ceanothus

See Celastus inermis.

Ceasma

(From Ceasma 1879 to split, or divide). A fissure or fragment.

Cebip

L'ra Brasiliensibus. (Indian.) Guacu, or Miri. A tree which grows in Brasil. Its bark is bitter and astringent, and the decoction is employed in baths and fomentations for the relief of pains in the limbs, diseases from cold, tumours of the feet and belly, itch, and other cutaneous diseases. It is figured by Margrave in his plants of Brasil, p. 100, but its botanical place has not been ascertained.

Cecis

(From Cecis 1880 to spring). A gall of the oak.

So called because it springs suddenly from the oak. See Gallae.

Cecryphalos

(From Cecryphalos 1881 to Aide). The net in which women confined their hair (Hippocrates). It is also applied to one of the stomachs of ruminating animals. See Abomasum.