Epicranium

(From Epicranium 3521 and the skull).

See Occipito frontalis.

Epicrasis

(From Epicrasis 3523 and to temper).

A critical evacuation, or an attemperation of bad humours. When a cure is performed in the latter way, it is called per epicrasin. The term is often employed by the Galenists and Boerhaavians; but as we have no evidence of a depraved state of the fluids in the circulating system, we are neither anxious to "attemper"or "evacuate"them.

Epictenion

(From Epictenion 3525 above, and pubes).

The part above the pubes; and the fine lint which is wafted in the air where flax is dressing.

Epicyema

And Epicyesis, (from Epicyema 3527 and to conceive). Epigonon. Superfoetation, superim-rregnation; a second conception whilst the woman is in a state of pregnancy: but this event never takes place. In Hippocrates it is a Foetus; sometimes a mole.

See Superfoetatio.

Epidemica Aqua

See Alexiteria aqua Spirituosa.

Epidermis

(From Epidermis 3531 and the skin). See

Clitoris.

Epidermis

(From Epidermis 3533 upon, and the skin ).

See Cuticula.

Epidesmis

(From Epidesmis 3535 and to bind). A bandage by which splints, bolsters, etc. are secured.

Epididymis

From Epididymis 3537 upon and a tes ticle). The epididymis may be reckoned a testis acces-sorius, called by Hippocrates, parastata. It is a body on the upper part of the testicle, formed of a continuation of the tubes that constitute its body: the continuance of the epididymis upwards forms the vas deferens. See Testes.

Epimdymis distensa. See Spermatocele.

Epidosis

(From Epidosis 3539 to increase). Preternatural enlargement of the parts.

Epidrome

(From Epidrome 3540 upon, and to fun).

An afflux of humours, particularly from a ligature.

Epigastricae Arteriae

(From epigastrum). The epigastric arteries. The external iliac artery divides into two branches at the ligamentum Poupartii; one of these is the epigastric, which runs to the inside of the rectus abdominis, at whose upper part it communicates with the internal mammary. Dr. Hunter observes, that in the operation for the femoral rupture, we endanger dividing the epigastrica if we cut upwards outwards; and if upwards and inwards, the spermatic, as the hernial sac lies in the angle between the

Epigastricae venae. The epigastric veins. The external iliac veins, a little before their going out of the belly, send off from the inside the epigastric veins, from whence branches run to the neighbouring glands, up the musculi recti abdominis, and then, advancing, join the mammaria.