Infusum

An infusion. Sometimes styled di-lutum; at others it means a clyster or an injection.

Ingesta

(From ingero, to throw in). The contents of the stomach; generally alimentary, sometimes medicinal.

Ingravidatio

(From ingravldor, to be great with child). See Impregnation

Inguen

(From Inguen 4566 to bring forth). The groin. The two groins, are the lateral divisions of the hypogastric region.

Inguinalis

(From inguen, the groin; so called from its supposed efficacy in diseases of the groin). See Eryngium.

Inhalatio

See Flmigatio.

Inhaler

An instrument recommended by Dr. Mudge for the cure of catarrhs, but now disused, though it may be in many cases probably advantageous.

Inhamae

Or1entales. See Batatas Hispanica.

Inhame

See Cara Buasiliensibus.

Inhumatio

(From inhumo, to bury in the ground). A method of digesting,"by burying in horse dung the vessel which contains the chemical ingredients to be digested.

Inimboia

See Bonduch Indorum.

Inion

(The place whence Inion 4567 the nerves, originate). Sec Occiput.

Injaculatio

(From injaculor, to shoot into). A violent spasmodic pain in the stomach, feeling as if darts were shot into it, with an immobility of the body. Van Helmont.

Innominata Arteria

(From in, non, and nomen, a name). This word is applied to any part that has no specific denomination. It is the external branch of the external iliac artery at its division, near Poupart's ligament, ascends outwardly to the inside of the spine of the ilium; is lost in the muscle of the belly, and sends branches to the ileus internus.

Innominati Nervi

A name of the fifth pair. See Trigemini nervi.

Innominatum

Os. Coxae ossa, os ilii,or cox-endix. The principal bone of the pelvis.

Innutritio

(From in, not, and nutrio, to nourish). See Atrophia.

Inoculatio

(From inoculo, to engraft). See Variola and Vaccina.

Inosculatio

(From in, and osculum, a little orifice). See Anastomosis.

Inpinguedo Porci

See Costus.

Insania

(From in, not, and sanus, sound). Delirium, or madness. See Mania.

Insertio

The union of parts so close that one seems to penetrate the substance of the other, as the insertion of muscles into a bone. It sometimes means the insertion of any instrument into a cavity of the body.

Insessio

Incessus, (from insideo, to ait upon). Sitting over relaxing vapours.

Insidens

(From the same,) applied in botany to that which rests upon another part.

Insidentia

(From the same). See Epistaxis.

Insidians

(From insidior, to deceive'). Insidious, latent; an epithet of diseases which betray no evident symptom, but are ready on any exciting cause to appear; or which, on their first attack, do not show their peculiar or dangerous nature.

Insipidus

(From in, non, and sapidus, savoury). Tasteless. See Apaeum.

Insitio

Engrafting.

Insipientia

(From in, priv. and sapientia, wisdom). Childishness; a low degree of delirium.

Insolatio

(From in, upon, and sol, the sun). Insolation; exposing any thing to the sun. See Ictus Solaris, of which this word is a synonym.