Kik

Or Kiki, (from kike, Arabic). See Cataputia.

Kikekunemalo

A gum resin, whose source we are not acquainted with. It has a subacrid resinous taste, and has been supposed an useful resolvent, as well as beneficial in nervous diseases.

Kilburn Waters

A bitter purging water. See Aquae minerales.

Kina

Kina, (from the countess of Cinchon). See Cortex Peruvianus.

Kina-kina aromatica. See Thuris Cortex. Kinkina Europaea. See Gentiana. Ki 'no, (Indian). See Gummi rubrum astrlngens.

Kippakelengu

See Battatas Hispanica.

Kiribunnawell

See China occidentalis.

Knawel

Ray. Tournefort calls it the chamae-linum vulgare folio gtabro flosculis plurimis. German" knot grass. Scleranthus perennis Lin. Sp. Pl 580. It is somewhat astringent, but never employed in medicine.

Kolerus

A dry ulcer.

Kolto

See Plica polonica.

Kraut Sauer

Pronounced by the English sour krout. See Brassica.

Kriebel Krankheit

See Raphania.

Krimna

See Alphita.

Kurudu

See Cin.vamomum.

Kutubuth

An Arabian name for a water spider, an insect perpetually in motion. Hence the name hath been transferred to a species of melancholy, called by Sennertus melancholia crrabunda. See Lycanthropia.

Kymia

See Cucurbita. Kyna. See Opoponax.

Labarium

(From labo). Looseness of the teeth.

Labdanum

See Ladanum.

Labeo

(From labium, a lift). See Chilon.

Labiates Arteriae

(From labia, lips). See Maxillariae arteriae.

Labiales glandulae. The labial glands. The membrane which covers the inside of the lips is a continuation of that on the cheeks, perforated by many small holes, which answer to the same number of small glands. See Winslow's Anatomy.

Labiatus

(From labia, a lip). See Flos labiatus.

Labis

(From Labis 4617 to lay hold of.) Any forceps.

Labium

See Labia.

Labour

See Parturitio.

Labrisulcium

(From labrum, a lift, and sulcus, a deep sore). A chap in the lip, cheilocace; generally attending swollen lips, and common in scrofula. It usually requires the treatment necessary in that disease; but, as a temporary relief, may be rubbed with the oleum cerae, or with the oleum amygdylarum and spermaceti. This also is the name given to the can-crum oris.

Labrum

Labrum 4618 from its power of receiving). See Dexamene.

Labrusca

(From labrum, a lip; so called becauseit grows on the sides of fields). See Bryonia alba.

Labyrinthus

Labyrinthus 4619 The labyrinth.

The second cavity of the ear, fodina, lies in the pars petrosa of the temporal bone, which runs forward and inward. It is an oblong body, divided into three parts, called the vestibulum, the cochlea, and the semicircular canals. The vestibulum (in which the stapes stands) is situated in the middle; the cochlea is the anterior, and lies forward and inward; and the semicircular canals, which compose the posterior part, lie backward and outward. The three parts of the labyrinth are lined by a fine periosteum, which spreads over, and shuts the two fenestra; of the tympanum.