While the large majority of range connections are very simple, involving no novel features, very often conditions and requirements arise which alter the matter entirely, often producing very difficult problems. Among the problems constantly arising, are those which require the connection to the same boiler of two or more ranges, coils, or heaters, and the supply from the hot-water system of heat for radiators and coils. When these multiple connections are used on the kitchen range, the conditions are generally such that the range alone furnishes sufficient heating capacity for the boiler, the additional heating capacity being needed only during the colder months.

These facts necessitate the making of connections in such a way that the boiler may be heated properly by the several heating surfaces together, or by either of them alone. A combination such as mentioned above which is often demanded, is to be seen in Fig. 327, in which a coil radiator on the floor above the range boiler is required to be heated, this additional service making it necessary to connect a coil in the furnace to give additional heat when the heating coil is being used. The best method under the circumstances, is to carry the flow pipe from the furnace coil directly to the top of the heating coil. This method delivers the water to the radiator before it has cooled to any extent, and gives the heating coil more power than other methods of connection would. A vent on the coil is necessary to prevent it from becoming air bound.

The return from the coil is carried into the return from the range boiler to the range, and a connection made from this pipe into the return of the furnace coil.

There is nothing about the connection described to interfere in any way with the regular work of the boiler in supplying hot water to the fixtures of the house.

Fig. 327.   Horizontal Boiler Heated by Furnace Coil and Coal Range

Fig. 327. - Horizontal Boiler Heated by Furnace Coil and Coal Range -.

Boiler Heats Coil on Floor Above.

Valves on the flow and return of the furnace coil will enable the cutting out of the coil from the rest of the system when the furnace is no longer in use.

Another common requirement is the heating of a radiator by the hot-water supply, when the only heating surface is that of the range. The great objection to this is that too much is often expected of such a connection, and also that it becomes a detriment sometimes to the regular work of the boiler. A small boiler heated by a small range should not be expected to provide both a hot-water supply and radiation.

Fig. 328.   Radiator Heated from Range Boiler.

Fig. 328. - Radiator Heated from Range Boiler.

A connection of this nature is to be seen in Fig. 328. A feed pipe for the radiator is taken from the range connection and carried to the radiator, which should be provided with an air valve, the return being taken into the return of the range connection. Valves are placed on the flow pipes to boiler and to radiator, the latter being located at the radiator if more desirable. The use of these valves allows the heat of the range to be thrown either to the boiler or to the radiator, as the case may be.

Fig. 329.   Wall Coil and Fixtures of Apartment Supplied by Horizontal Boiler.

Fig. 329. - Wall Coil and Fixtures of Apartment Supplied by Horizontal Boiler.

For instance, if the demand for hot water is heavy, the radiator may be turned off for the time being. It must be seen to, however, that each of the two valves is not closed at the same time. In this connection it may be stated that valves should be used to as small an extent as possible on hot-water supply work, as their wrong use is sometimes attended with serious consequences.

Small rooms, such as bath rooms, small bedrooms, etc., which would require only a few feet of radiation may often be successfully heated in this way.

Fig. 330.   Heating Radiator by Stove Coil on Floor Below Stove.

Fig. 330. - Heating Radiator by Stove Coil on Floor Below Stove.

Another familiar problem is that requiring the heating of a radiator or coil on the same floor as the range and boiler. Such an arrangement is shown in Fig. 329. To heat the coil, the flow pipe from the boiler is carried up and then directly down into the top of the coil or radiator, a valve being placed on the pipe. The return is connected from the bottom of the coil or radiator into the return of the range connection. It is necessary to relieve this connection of air by means of an air valve at its high point. In the case of a supply system under tank pressure, the expansion pipe would perform this duty.

Fig. 331.   Range Boiler Heated by Furnace Coil, Gas Range and Coal Range.

Fig. 331. - Range Boiler Heated by Furnace Coil, Gas Range and Coal Range.

A more uncommon connection is shown in Fig. 330, in which a radiator is to be heated by a stove coil, without use of the hot-water supply system, and with the radiator on the floor below the stove. This radiator may be heated by running the flow pipe from the stove as high as possible, and connecting it into an expansion tank provided with an overflow. From the bottom of the expansion tank a feed pipe into the bottom of the radiator is taken, and the return end of the radiator connected back to the return of the coil. The water in the tank must stand above the opening of the flow pipe into it, and should be turned on from time to time to make up for any loss that may have been sustained.

The heating of a radiator under these adverse conditions is due to the weight of water rather than to circulation, and can be made to give fair results with a good heating surface in the stove.

The range boiler is very often fed from two or more different sources, such, for instance, as kitchen range, furnace coil, laundry heaters, gas ranges, etc. Such a combination is seen in Fig. 331 in which the boiler is heated by a coal range, gas range, and furnace coil. Either one of these sources of heat may be used independently of the others.

The connections of the flow pipes from the two ranges are so made as to produce quick heating of the boiler, while the flow pipe from the furnace coil enters the boiler at the side in the usual manner. The boiler shown in Fig. 331 is of the three-tube pattern, which allows the circulating pipe to be carried to the bottom of the boiler.