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Principles Of Home Decoration With Practical Examples | Candace Wheeler



Probably no art has so few masters as that of decoration. In England, Morris was for many years the great leader, but among his followers in England no one has attained the dignity of unquestioned authority; and in America, in spite of far more general practice of the art, we still are without a leader whose very name establishes law. It is true we are free to draw inspiration from the same sources which supplied Morris and the men associated with him in his enthusiasms, and in fact we do lean, as they did, upon English eighteenth - century domestic art - and derive from the men who made that period famous many of our articles of faith; but there are almost no authoritative books upon the subject of appropriate modern decoration. Our text books are still to be written; and one must glean knowledge from many sources, shape it into rules, and test the rules, before adopting them as safe guides...

TitlePrinciples Of Home Decoration With Practical Examples
AuthorCandace Wheeler
PublisherDoubleday, Page & Company
Year1903
Copyright1903, Doubleday, Page & Company
AmazonPrinciples of Home Decoration

By Candace Wheeler, author of "Decorators and Decorating", "Content in a Garden", "How to Make Rugs"

-Chapter I. Decoration As An Art
Who creates a Home, creates a potent spirit which in turn doth fashion him that fashioned. Probably no art has so few masters as that of decoration. In England, Morris was for many years the great ...
-Decoration As An Art. Continued
To Americans this does not seem a remarkable fact. We have come into a period which desires beauty, and each one secures it as best he can. We are a teachable and a studious people, with a faculty of ...
-Chapter II. Character In Houses
For the created still doth shadow forth the mind and will which made it. Thou art the very mould of thy creator.' IT NEEDS the combined personality of the family to make the character of the hou...
-Chapter III. Builders' Houses
Mine own hired house. A LARGE proportion of homes are made in houses which are not owned, but leased, and this prevents each man or family from indicating personal taste in external aspect. A rich ...
-Chapter IV. Colour In Houses
Heaven gives us of its colour, for our joy, Hues which have words and speak to ye of heaven. A LTHOUGH the very existence of a house is a matter of construction, its general interior effect is alm...
-Chapter V. The Law Of Appropriateness
I HAVE laid much stress upon the value of colour in interior decoration, but to complete the beauty of the home something more than happy choice of tints is required. It needs careful and educated sel...
-The Law Of Appropriateness. Part 2
As a matter of utility the toilet service should be always of white; so that there will be no chance for the slovenly mismatching which results from breakage of any one of the different pieces, when o...
-The Law Of Appropriateness. Part 3
It is the principle or requirement, of geometric base in interior design which, coupled with our natural delight in yielding or growing forms, has maintained through all the long history of decoration...
-Chapter VI. Kitchens
THE kitchen is an important part of the perfect house and should be a recognised sharer in its quality of beauty; not alone the beauty which consists of a successful adaptation of means to ends, but t...
-Chapter VII. Colour With Reference To Light
IN choosing colour for walls and ceilings, it is most necessary to consider the special laws which govern its application to house interiors. The tint of any particular room should be chosen not only...
-Colour With Reference To Light. Continued
If colours which we like have a soothing effect upon us, those which we do not like are, on the other hand, an unwelcome influence. If a woman says in her heart, I hate green, or red, or I dislike any...
-Chapter VIII. Walls, Ceilings, And Floors
THE true principle of wall treatment is to make the boundary stand for colour and beauty, and not alone for division of space. As a rule, the colour treatment of a house interior must begin with the ...
-Walls, Ceilings, And Floors. Part 2
Nevertheless if the soul craves tapestries let them be chosen for intrinsic beauty and perfect preservation, instead of accepting the rags of the past and trying to create with them a magnificence whi...
-Walls, Ceilings, And Floors. Part 3
The ordinary process of painting in dyes upon a wool or linen fabric woven in tapestry method, and fixing the colour with heat, enables the painter - if a true tapestry subject is chosen and tapestry ...
-Chapter IX. Location Of The House
BESIDES the difference in treatment demanded by different use of rooms - the character of the decoration of the whole house will be influenced by its situation. A house in the country or a house in to...
-Chapter X. Ceilings
As ceilings are in reality a part of the wall, they must always be considered in connection with room interiors, but their influence upon the beauty of the average house is so small, that their treatm...
-Chapter XI. Floors And Floor-Coverings
ALTHOUGH in ordinary sequence the colouring of floors comes after that of walls, the fact that - in important houses - costly and elaborate floors of mosaic or of inlaid wood form part of the architec...
-Chapter XII. Draperies
DRAPERIES are not always considered as a part of furnishings, yet in truth - as far as decorative necessities are concerned - they should come immediately after wall and floor coverings. The household...
-Draperies. Continued
This throws us back upon cottons and linens for inexpensive hangings, and in all the thousand forms 'in which these two fibres are manufactured it would seem easy to choose those which are beautiful, ...
-Chapter XIII. Furniture
ALTHOUGH the forms and varieties of furniture are infinite, they can easily be classified first into the two great divisions of good and bad, and after that into kinds and styles; but no matter how go...
-Furniture. Part 2
Nevertheless, with modern methods of manufacture it is by no means certain that a hundred years will secure possession of the furniture we buy to-day to our grandchildren. In those early days it was n...
-Furniture. Part 3
Since the revived interest in the making of furniture, we find an occasional and marked recurrence to primitive form - on each occasion the apparently new style taking on the name of the man who produ...
-Furniture. Part 4
There were panelled front doors with beautifully fluted columns and carved capitals, surmounted by half-ovals of curiously designed sashes; there were beautifully wrought iron railings, and elaborate ...
-Furniture. Part 5
But one may say, It requires knowledge to do this; much knowledge in the selection of the comparatively few things which are to make up such an interior, and that is true - and the knowledge is to b...
-Furniture. Part 6
The dining-room shares with the hall a purpose common to the life of the family, and, while it admits of much more variety and elaboration, that which is true of the hall is equally true of the dining...
-Furniture. Part 7
Gold-coloured or yellow canvas with oak mouldings lighten and warm the walls; and rugs with a preponderance of white and yellow transform a dark hall into a light and cheerful one. It must be remember...
-Furniture. Part 8
The lesson is in the use of yellow and white, accented with touches of blue, which converts a dark and perfectly cheerless room into a glitter of light and warmth. The third example I shall give is o...
-Furniture. Part 9
Then, again, the amount of living and brilliant colour is exactly proportioned to that of sombre brown, the red holding its value by strength, as against the greatly preponderating mass of dark. On th...
-Furniture. Part 10
The notable and enjoyable colour of the room is seen from the very entrance of the house, the broad main hall making a carpeted highway to the wide opening of the room, where a sheaf of tinted sunset ...







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