books

no previous pagepage up: Furniture Books
  
next page: Early English Furniture and Woodwork | by Herbert Cescinsky, Ernest. R. Gribble

Colonial Furniture In America | by Luke Vincent Lockwood



During the eleven years that have elapsed since the publication of the first edition of this work, many important pieces of furniture have been brought to the attention of the writer, which substantiate the theory of development therein expressed. The writer has had the opportunity to examine several thousand pieces of American and English furniture, and from this examination it has become possible to determine in many instances the section of the country in which a piece was made. This examination has also shown the importance of mouldings in determining date and locality, and emphasis has been placed upon this feature throughout this work. So much new material has been acquired that the book has been entirely rewritten, the type reset, and the form extended to two volumes.

TitleColonial Furniture In America
AuthorLuke Vincent Lockwood
PublisherCharles Scribner's Sons
Year1913
Copyright1913, Charles Scribner's Sons
AmazonColonial Furniture In America

New And Greatly Enlarged Edition

With Eight Hundred And Sixty Seven Illustrations Of Representative Pieces

-Preface
DURING the eleven years that have elapsed since the publication of the first edition of this work, many important pieces of furniture have been brought to the attention of the writer, which substantia...
-Preface To First Edition
THE object of the present volume is to furnish the collector, and other persons interested in the subject of American colonial furniture, with a trustworthy handbook on the subject, having especially ...
-I. Introduction
THE history of the cabinet-maker's art is the record of the unconscious struggle toward an ideal which, when finally attained, destroyed all further inspiration. This ideal persisted from one age to a...
-I. Introduction. Part 2
The Puritan emigration was, however, quite different. The purpose of their exodus from England was to form a theocratic government in the new country moulded after the model set for them in the Old Te...
-I. Introduction. Part 3
Nothing, perhaps, influenced the furniture of the eighteenth century so much as the introduction of mahogany, the strength of which made possible a quite new method of carving, delicate and lace-like,...
-I. Introduction. Part 4
It appears that Chippendale was married to Catherine Redshaw, of Saint Martin's in the Field, May 19, 1748, and that in 1749 he had a shop in Conduit Street, Long Acre, London, and removed from there,...
-I. Introduction. Part 5
The Subscribers may be assured that Number XXVI. of this Work, will be published very speedily; and Mr. Chippendale hopes to make amends for this Delay, by presenting them with near ONE HUNDRED NEW DE...
-I. Introduction. Part 6
Figure 3 shows one of a pair of settees in Chippendale's Chinese taste with a slight suggestion of the Gothic in the arching under the arms. Although full of Chinese motifs and feeling, an analysis wi...
-I. Introduction. Part 7
The business of furniture-making appears to have been subdivided. There were joiners, turners, chair-makers, Windsor chair-makers, carvers, and cabinetmakers, but it is doubtful whether the line of di...
-II. Chests
AS has often been pointed out, chests have been in use for many centuries. One of the first indications of civilisation in man is the accumulation of property, and this necessitates a place for storin...
-II. Chests. Part 2
Figure 8 shows a very beautiful carved chest in the Bolles Collection, the property of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The top rail is carved in a guil-loche design, the outer stiles in laurelling, an...
-II. Chests. Part 3
There is strong indication that in New York, where the Dutch influence was largely felt, the chests were not in general of the carved and panelled varieties in use in the English colonies. The invento...
-II. Chests. Part 4
Figure 20 shows a panelled and carved chest without drawers in the Connecticut pattern from the Bolles Collection, owned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The outer panels are carved in the same de...
-II. Chests. Part 5
The mouldings on the best panelled chests are of cedar, but, as a rule, on the American-made chests they are of pine, and painted or stained red in imitation of cedar or rosetta-wood (an East Indian w...
-II. Chests. Part 6
An interesting variation of the Hadley chest is shown in Figure 31, which is the property of Mr. William J. Hickmott, of Hartford. The top rail, instead of being carved in the flower-and-leaf design, ...
-II. Chests. Part 7
A late form of a chest with two drawers is shown in Figure 40. The chest of drawers had already become popular, and the front of the chest part has two blind drawers to give the appearance of a four-d...
-III. Chests Of Drawers
THE evolution of the chest of drawers from the chest with drawers was natural and practicable. The greater convenience of the drawers over the chest must have been apparent from the time the chest fir...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 2
Figure 45 shows a chest of drawers, the property of the writer. The top drawer is divided into two plain rectangular panels with heavy moulded edges. The next drawer has two octagonal panels with a re...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 3
It will be interesting in the following pages to trace how the style developed until it reached the point where its original object had been lost sight of, and pieces were built with drawers so high t...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 4
Such was the normal development of the six-legged high-boy. Had cabinetmakers discarded their old moulding-planes as the styles changed, one could date such a piece of furniture from the mouldings alo...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 5
Figure 54, also from the Erving Collection, is a sycamore chest of drawers, probably of American manufacture. The stretchers on this piece are original, as are also the fine drop handles. The moulding...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 6
A dressing-table with a slate top is shown in Figure 62 rod is the property of Mr. W. F. J. Boardman, of Hartford, Connecticut The legs are cup-chaped and the stretchers are in the usual X design. The...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 7
Figure 70 shows another six-legged high-boy of whitewood, the property of Miss C. M. Traver, of New York. The cornice is composed of a quarter-round, a fillet, a cyma recta, a fillet, and a cove with ...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 8
Figure 70 shows a japanned high-boy in the Bolles Collection. The cornice is composed of a cpiarter-round, a fillet, a cyma recta, a fillet, a small cove, a fillet and a large cove, an astragal, a fil...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 9
The common form of a flat-top, bandy-legged high-boy is shown in Figure 86. The cornice is composed of a quarter-round, a fillet, a cove, an astragal, a fillet, and a cove, which was the form of corni...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 10
Figure 92 shows the regular type of a scroll-top high chest of drawers which is one of those purchased by Dr. Ezekiel Porter in 1730, above referred to. The cornice is composed of the following mouldi...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 11
Figure 101 shows a block-front dressing-table which is the property of Mr. A. W. Wellington, of Boston. The top is cut in the shape of the block-front chests of drawers. There arc six small drawers wi...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 12
Figure 105 shows another high chest of drawers quite similar to the preceding one, which is the property of Mr. William W. Smith, of Hartford. The cornice mouldings and the flame finials are in the ch...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 13
Figure 111 shows one of the must elaborately carved dressing-tables that has been found which belongs to the Pendleton Collection. The top is moulded in the usual way, and below is a fillet, a cove, a...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 14
Block-front pieces are usually made of mahogany or maple and are found with the straight bracket, ogee bracket, or bird's claw and ball feet. The fronts of the drawers are cut from a block of wood suf...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 15
When the block-front type of chests of drawers came into use, the popularity of the high-boy and low-boy was on the decline, and consequently a different form of dressing-table had to be adopted, whic...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 16
An unusually handsome low chest of drawers in Chippendale style is shown in Figure 127. The front is cut in the serpentine shape; that is, it is composed of two cyma curves so placed that there are tw...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 17
Figure 135 shows a reverse serpentine low chest of drawers; that is, the outer curves are convex and the centre one concave; the drawers are flush and the piece Stands on bird's claw and ball feet. At...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 18
Figure 145 shows another chest of drawers in Empire style. The top is backed and supported at the ends by short columns carved in the pineapple pattern. There are three small drawers at the top and fo...
-III. Chests Of Drawers. Part 19
Previous to this there is mention of a broaken mahogany skreen in the inventory of John Jones, in 1708, at Philadelphia, valued at two shillings. If we conclude, then, that the use of mahogany for f...
-IV. Cupboards And Sideboards
AT the time when the American colonies were settled, cupboards had been in common use for generations. As the name implies, they were originally bordes on which to set drinking-cups. The earliest of...
-IV. Cupboards And Sideboards. Part 2
As far as this country is concerned, court and livery are used quite interchangeably, if one may judge from values given, for the prices of both are equally small or large, as the case may be: a court...
-IV. Cupboards And Sideboards. Part 3
Such examples of carving as that last shown make it appear rather remarkable that the New England inventories do not mention carving in connection with cupboards and only very occasionally in the desc...
-IV. Cupboards And Sideboards. Part 4
Figure 168 shows a press cupboard, the property of Mr. Maxwell C. Greene, of Providence, which, although English, has been in this country from colonial times. The top edge is carved in a chevron desi...
-IV. Cupboards And Sideboards. Part 5
Figure 173 shows a piece very rarely found in this country which belonged to the late Walter Hosmer, of Wethersfield, Connecticut, which may, perhaps, be such a piece as was referred to in several Yor...
-IV. Cupboards And Sideboards. Part 6
Figure 175 shows a kas in the possession of Mrs. Henry R. Beekman, of New York. The wood is walnut throughout, and the carving, which is well executed, is applied in the method common in such pieces. ...
-IV. Cupboards And Sideboards. Part 7
Figure 179 shows a wardrobe belonging to Mrs. Russell, of Woodstock, Connecticut. It is built exactly like the cabinet top of a scrutoire, and it belongs to the period of scroll-type high chests of dr...
-IV. Cupboards And Sideboards. Part 8
Figure 185 shows a side cupboard built into the Robinson house, at Saun-derstown, Rhode Island. Inside are two fluted pilasters supporting the shell arch on each of which is carved a rosette. At the c...
-Sideboards
Sideboards, as we know them, are comparatively recent inventions belonging to the latter half of the eighteenth century. The court and livery cupboards were extensively used in the dining-rooms, or p...
-Sideboards. Part 2
Figure 201 shows a sideboard table, the property of Professor Barrett Wendell. It stands high from the ground on straight legs whose surfaces are cut in double ogee mouldings. The lower edge is finish...
-Sideboards. Part 3
Figure 207 shows a very beautiful sideboard with eight legs; the outer ends are concave, then a short, straight section, and the centre is serpentine. On the left end is a drawer and on the right a cu...
-Sideboards. Part 4
Figure 215 shows another Sheraton sideboard with china closet, the property of Mr. R. H. Maynard, of Boston. The cornice consists of a fillet, a cyma recta, a fillet, an astragal, and a fillet, below ...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires
DESKS, in one form or another, have been known from the eighth century. In his Natural History, Bacon makes the following remark: Some trees are best for planchers, as deal; some for tables, cupbo...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 2
Two interesting boxes in the Bolles Collection are shown in Figure 228. They are carved in the design known as Friesland, which consists of geometrical shapes, stars, wheels, and diaper pattern. This ...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 3
From about the year 1660, or possibly a little earlier, a new style of furniture for writing purposes seems to have come into use called scrutore, or scriptoire, as some of the inventories call t...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 4
A crude scrutoire of the same period is shown in Figure 242 and is in the Bolles Collection. A number of such pieces have been found in New England and they closely resemble the chest shown in Figure ...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 5
There is no drawer in the table part and the skirt is cut in a serrated edge. The legs are turned, ending in flat balls, and resemble inverted tenpins. The desk section has one drawer below the lid, a...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 6
This distinction hardly seems to us probable, because a low chest of drawers could have been properly described by calling it by that name, as had been the custom in the inventories of the oak period,...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 7
Figure 257 shows a scrutoire in which the drawers in the desk part are cut in ogee curves and the decoration is obtained by carving and burning the design into the wood. It was found in central Pennsy...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 8
Figure 263 shows a block-front scrutoire of a little different type. It will be seen that the depressed section is in the same plane as the outer edges, instead of being depressed, and this gives the ...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 9
A southern New England block-front, cabinet-top scrutoire is shown in Figure 269. The top is scrolled and hooded, and the mouldings are a quarter-round, a fillet, a cove, an astragal, a fillet, and a ...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 10
The second type of these scrutoires are those in which the mouldings on the inner ends of the scroll are finished with a returned moulding instead of a rosette. Figure 273 is an example of this kind,...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 11
Figure 278 shows another block-front, cabinet-top scrutoire in which the pediment effect was obtained by a fret extending across the ends and front. The top is scrolled and hooded. The scrolls termina...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 12
All of these pieces, with the exception of the bombe feature, are very similar to early Chippendale designs, and may have been made by the same cabinetmaker, who undoubtedly was familiar with Chippend...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 13
Figure 288 shows a reverse serpentine-front, slant-top scrutoire with cabinet top which is in the Bolles Collection. The pediment top is very unusual in that the mouldings of the scroll do not extend ...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 14
Figure 295 them a knee-hole writing-table, the property of the writer. The top folds upon itself and when open is supported by pulls. There is a long drawer at the top and on each side of the recessed...
-V. Desks And Scrutoires. Part 15
Figure 302 shows a still later form of scrutoire with bookcase top. The cornice mouldings are a quarter-round, a fillet, a dentil moulding, a fillet, a cove, an astragal, and a fillet, and the top is ...
-VI. Looking-Glasses
THE use of mirrors dates from prehistoric times. They were of polished metal, small, and generally intended to be used in the hand. It was not until the early sixteenth century that glass was used for...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 2
In Virginia, in 1678, is mentioned 1 olive wood glass, 1 large walnut tree glass 4 14s; at Philadelphia, in 1687, an olive wood diamond cut looking glass. A number of these olive-wood looking-gl...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 3
Another looking-glass of the type under discussion is shown in Figure 316. The frame is walnut and the mouldings are a bead on the outer edge and an ovolo. The upper plate is cut in a leaf design with...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 4
A very simple form of the type of looking-glass now under discussion is shown in Figure 324 and is the property of Mr. C. R. Morson, of Brooklyn. The cresting is cut in the form of two shallow scrolls...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 5
Another looking-glass with a scroll pediment, the property of the writer, is shown in Figure 331. On either side is the scroll, the inner edges finished with carved rosettes with pendent flowers. The ...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 6
Figure 336 shows a mantel looking-glass in the Pendleton Collection, owned by the Rhode Island School of Design. At the top are C scrolls with acanthus-leaf borders and dripping-water effects, and wit...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 7
We now come to the lata example of the cut-work looking-glasses of which Figure 325 was a prototype. It will he seen that the upper edges of the tooking-glassea in Figure 343 are curved in the same ma...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 8
A few sconces similar to the one last shown have been found in this country in the South. Figure 353 shows a shield-shaped looking-glass, the property of Mrs. F. B. Watkinson, of Hartford. The shape ...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 9
Figure 360 shows another of these looking-glasses which is the property of Mr. Marsden J. Perry, of Providence. At the centre is a figure probably intended to represent Ceres, and above her head is a ...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 10
Another bilboa looking-glass is shown in Figure 368 and is in the Bolles Collection, owned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. On the sides are engaged columns above which are urn finials, and at the...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 11
Figure 377 shows a very handsome pier looking-glass, the property of Mr. Dwight Blaney, of Boston. The cornice is composed of a series of reedings bound together with straps, and on the cove moulding ...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 12
Figure 385 shows another looking-glass in the same collection. At the top are pendent acorns, and on either side in relief are classical figures and at the centre is a shell. On either side of the loo...
-VI. Looking-Glasses. Part 13
Figure 393 shows another style of small looking-glass of the same period. Quite a number of looking-glasses like this one and the one shown in the next figure arc found in this country, and they appea...
-VII. Chairs
IN no article of furniture is the development of style so easily traced as in chairs, for, although they have no mouldings, handles, or other such earmarks of the period as chests of drawers, each sty...
-Turned Spindle-Back Chair
The turned chairs were of simple construction. The rails were let into holes bored to receive them, mortised and tenoned, and were often held in place with draw-bore pins holding all the joints tight,...
-Slat-Back Turned Chairs
The second type of turned chair has a much longer history and is found late in the eighteenth century; in fact, it probably suggested the so-called ladder backs to the cabinetmakers of the Chippendale...
-Wainscot Chairs
The second style of chair found prior to 1650 is the oak chair known as the wainscot chair. The word wainscot is derived from the Dutch wagen-schot, literally a wagon partition, referring to the b...
-Leather Chairs
The third style, which may be called a modification of the wainscot, is the leather chair, which dates a little later and by some is called Cromwellian. although it appears in the inventories in this ...
-First Type Of Cane Chairs
The first type is a continuation and refinement of the earlier turned chairs, the earliest form being similar to Figure 447 except for a panel of cane in the back and seat. This simple form was quickl...
-First Type Of Cane Chairs. Continued
Figure 457 shows a side chair of later date. The cresting is carved in the design of C scrolls, and at the centre was an inlaid star the inlay of which is missing. The finials are in the form of acorn...
-Second Type Of Cane Chairs
As has been stated above, the second type of cane chair consists of those in which the carved cresting extends over the stiles of the back. These are later than the first type, not having appeared muc...
-Third Type Of Cane Chairs
The third type of cane chairs are those in which the stiles of the back are not turned, but moulded, and appear to carry in a continuous line over the top. In this type the stiles of the back are ofte...
-Dutch Type Of Chairs
The new style, which we have seen foreshadowed in the preceding illustrations, was. from the structural point of view, a distinct advance in the evolution toward lightness. It seems strange that, a fe...
-Easy-Chairs
Not all of the chairs of the early eighteenth century were as straight and austere as those above sho wn. The records make frequent mention of easy-chairs. This form of chair had a high back and wings...
-Roundabout Chairs
A style of chair very popular in the first half of the eighteenth century is the roundabout chair. Its popularity was probably due to its comfort, obtained from the curved back. It is constructed with...
-Windsor Chairs
Probably no variety of chair was so popular in this country during the last half of the eighteenth century as the Windsor chair. The origin of the chair is not known. Tradition says it received its na...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840
The period now under consideration is marked by an extravagance of taste and fluctuation of fashions never before attained, which were primarily due to the sudden increase in wealth in the colonies an...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840. Part 2
Not by any means were all the Chippendale chairs of the ornate type so commonly associated with his name. Such chairs were expensive, and many of his designs, even in England, were very simple, but in...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840. Part 3
Figure 545 shows another chair of the same design in which the design is worked out in its purity. Of course such a chair as this was the model from which the other simpler ones were made. On the cres...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840. Part 4
Figure 551 shows a chair in the writer's possession in which the splat is cut in another early design. The scroll of the splat appears to commence at the outer ends of the cresting and to carry throug...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840. Part 5
Figure 560 shows an arm-chair in which there is a suggestion of the Gothic style caused by the interweaving of ribbon-like pieces. The cresting is carved in rococo and leaf design, and pendent flowers...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840. Part 6
Just as, a half-century before, the Dutch, then the controllers of the Eastern trade, had borrowed the ball and claw foot from the Chinese, so now Chippendale borrowed extensively from other Chinese d...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840. Part 7
It was also the fashion in this period for furniture to be made in imitation of bamboo, and a splendid example of an arm-chair made in that manner is shown in Figure 576. The back is composed of inter...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840. Part 8
The upholstered chairs that are most frequently found in England and here are of the types following. Figure 582 shows an earlier upholstered chair of the Chippendale period, as indicated by its high...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840. Part 9
Figure 593 shows a chair in Hepplewhite style, the property of Mr. Richard A. Canfield. The back is shield-shaped and the cresting is carved at the centre with flowers. There are three central support...
-The Period Of The Cabinet-Makers, 1750-1840. Part 10
Figures 605 and 606 show two simple forms of Sheraton chairs. The first has three spindles swelling and split at the centre with carved rosettes, and the other has three carved braces with a medallion...
-VIII. Settees, Couches, And Sofas
THE words settee and sofa have often been used interchangeably, and there seems to have been no uniformity in their use, even among the cabinet-makers of the eighteenth century. For the purpose of thi...
-VIII. Settees, Couches, And Sofas. Continued
Figure 623 shows a double chair in the plain Dutch style, having all the characteristics of a chair of the same period. The lines are all softened into cyma curves, which gives the piece a very gracef...
-Couches
We now come to a totally different kind of furniture, known in this country as a couch, but in England called a day-bed and by the French a chaise longue. The latter name is the best description, for ...
-Couches. Continued
Figure 644 shows a couch, in the pure Dutch style, with six cabriole legs terminating in club feet. The back stiles are cut in the characteristic cyma curves. The couch is underbraced with turned stre...
-Sofas
We now come to the discussion of the sofa, which, according to our definition, differs from the settee in that it is upholstered and does not closely follow the design of a chair back. Such pieces are...
-Sofas. Continued
The Sheraton sofa shown in Figure 660 belongs to Mr. R. T. Haines Halsey, of New York. On the surface of the top rail are carved, in cameo carving, festoons of drapery caught up with bow knots. At the...
-IX. Tables
MANY of the facts already noted regarding chairs are applicable also to tables, as almost every form of chair has its corresponding table. During Saxon times England did not know or use the word table...
-IX. Tables. Part 2
Another early American table is shown in Figure 676 and is the property of the writer. The table is made of Virginia walnut throughout, and the top is seven feet one inch long, being held in place on ...
-IX. Tables. Part 3
Figure 682 shows a simple gate-leg table of maple, the property of Mr. Dwight Blaney. The legs and stretchers are delicately turned in the vase, ring, and bulb pattern. It is this form of gate-leg tab...
-IX. Tables. Part 4
A style of table of which there are many specimens found in Connecticut is shown in Figure 693. The legs are slightly raked and the leaves are supported by large wings which are pivoted in the stretch...
-IX. Tables. Part 5
Another table of the same sort, but of a little later date, is shown in Figure 702 and is the property of Mr. H. W. Erving, of Hartford. The turning is of the vase, ring, and bulb pattern. It is prob...
-IX. Tables. Part 6
Figure 714 shows .a sample table in the Erving Collection, and, although the legs arc not turned in the cup or trumpet shapes, the cross-stretchers and the separate ball feet stamp it as belonging to ...
-IX. Tables. Part 7
A large dining-table of the same construction is shown in Figure 721. The legs are cabriole and terminate in the animal's claw and ball feet, and on the legs are carved acanthus leaves. This table is ...
-IX. Tables. Part 8
The second style of the first type with a flaring skirt is shown in Figure 732, the property of Mr. George S. Palmer, of New London. It has the regular rectangular top with raised edges, and the skirt...
-IX. Tables. Part 9
Figure 742 shows a bedside-table, the property of the late Mrs. Frank H. Bos-worth, of New York. The top has the tray edge. There are three drawers, and the piece stands on small cabriole legs termina...
-IX. Tables. Part 10
Figure 750 shows a pie-crust table with a gallery top in the possession of Mr. John J. Gilbert, of Baltimore. The top is composed of two long serpentine curves on the sides .and a large and two small...
-IX. Tables. Part 11
Another card-table is shown in Figure 762. The top is shown raised. At the four corners are rounded sections to hold the candles and there are four oval wells to hold chips. The frame is cut with roun...
-IX. Tables. Part 12
After the adoption of the Hepplewhite and Sheraton styles, between the years 1780 and 1800, the cabriole leg was dropped and the straight square leg or the slender fluted leg took its place on furnitu...
-IX. Tables. Part 13
With Sheraton's late designs, about the year 1800, the fine outlines that distinguished the cabinet-work of the eighteenth century passed out of style, and in their place came the rather uncouth and h...
-IX. Tables. Part 14
Figure 787 shows a tripod-table in Sheraton style. The top is octagonal with raised edge. The column is reeded and the feet turn under in the manner characteristic of the Sheraton school, which is the...
-X. Bedsteads
THERE is, perhaps, no branch of the subject of furniture more difficult to approach than that of bedsteads, and this not because they were by any means scarce, but because the bedsteads of the sevente...
-X. Bedsteads. Part 2
Many of the earliest bedsteads of which the records speak were doubtless merely frames on which to place the mattresses or beds; judging from the valuations, such frames may be referred to at Plymouth...
-X. Bedsteads. Part 3
In New England, where practically all the examples of seventeenth-century furniture now known have been found, the less extravagant habits of the people caused them to be more conservative; but, notwi...
-X. Bedsteads. Part 4
Another early bedstead is shown in Figure 803. The foot-posts are round and terminate in crude bandy legs. The head-posts are chamfered and the headboard plain, as in the preceding figure. Bedste...
-Bedsteads
Figure 814. Mahogany Bedstead in Sheraton style, 1790-1800. Figure 814 shows a simpler bedstead of the same style, the property of Mr. Merle Forman, of Brooklyn. The four posts are turned in vase...
-XI. Clocks
WE do not consider that clocks technically should be classified as furniture, and still, as there is hardly a collector who does not possess at least one specimen, we think it may be well to give a br...
-XI. Clocks. Part 2
The earliest clocks had no pendulum, but a balance controlled the movement, and about the middle of the seventeenth century the pendulum came into use. The original pendulum was short, about the lengt...
-XI. Clocks. Part 3
Figure 829 shows a Dutch bracket clock, the face and ornaments gilded and the face painted. The feet are of wood and in the usual Dutch ball-foot style. It has a bob pendulum and the works are of bras...
-XI. Clocks. Part 4
Figure 833 shows another early clock. The case is made of pine or some other soft wood, and the band of carving at the top is early in design. This clock-case also has the single-arch moulding about t...
-XI. Clocks. Part 5
A handsome Claggett dial is shown in Figure 841 and is on a clock, the property of Miss F. F. Hasbrouck, of Providence. The spandrels are in the usual Figure 841. Dial to Claggett clock, 1730-40....
-XI. Clocks. Part 6
Figure 849 shows a tall clock, the property of Mr. H. W. Erving. The case is inlaid with medallions, fan corners, and scrolls in the manner of the Sheraton school. The base is cut to resemble stone wo...
-XI. Clocks. Part 7
Figure 857 shows a splendid example of this type of clock, the property of Mr. Dwight M. Prouty, of Boston. It is a marriage dock, so-called, is decorated in pink and blue, and is much more elaborate ...







TOP
no previous pagepage up: Furniture Books
  
next page: Early English Furniture and Woodwork | by Herbert Cescinsky, Ernest. R. Gribble