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French Furniture | by Andre Saglio



The history of furniture in a country of a civilisation so old and so brilliant as that of France is a very different thing from a technical review of archaeology or art. It is the history of the very soul of a people, with its alternations of grandeur and of degradation, of achievement and of failure; in a word, it is the history of the inner life of a nation, a life that is too often overlooked in studying the glorious or tragic episodes in which kings and nobles overshadow their subjects. Yet those subjects are as important as dynasties in the annals of history. Turn, for instance, for a moment from the accounts of the victories of this or that conqueror to the home of some one of the men whose destinies he controls...

TitleFrench Furniture
AuthorAndre Saglio
PublisherB. T. Batsford
Year1913
Copyright1913, B. T. Batsford
AmazonFrench Furniture
French Furniture 2
-Introduction
The history of furniture in a country of a civilisation so old and so brilliant as that of France is a very different thing from a technical review of archaeology or art. It is the history of the ...
-The Gauls, The Gallo-Romans, And The Invaders Of Gaul
WHEN the Romans took possession of Gaul they had to contend with a strong, intelligent, and numerous population, divided into a multitude of tribes, the civilisation of which could only be called ...
-The Gauls, The Gallo-Romans, And The Invaders Of Gaul. Part 2
This will explain how it was that domestic art in Gaul, instead of spreading rapidly, was merely gradually transformed into the heavy, massive style that very distinctly dominates the architectural tr...
-The Gauls, The Gallo-Romans, And The Invaders Of Gaul. Part 3
It was not until the structure of furniture was modified, the size of the panels becoming smaller, whilst more iron-work was required, that the painting intended to relieve the monotony of the wide sp...
-The Fourteenth Century
THE most noteworthy characteristic of the fourteenth century was that luxury - derived exclusively during the eleventh and , thirteenth centuries from religious sources - became purely secular. Ou...
-The Fourteenth Century. Continued
The number and value of the purchases there set down would indeed be surprising, if nothing were considered but the demands upon the treasury necessitated by the political events of the day, but it mu...
-The Fifteenth Century
IN a technical history such as that we are now writing the term fifteenth century must be taken to refer, not to a definitely restricted period, but to the school of art which in it carried on t...
-The Fifteenth Century. Part 2
Fresh acquisitions were constantly made: dressers and benches for Antony of Burgundy, known as le Grand Batard; a wooden chest with iron clamps for the reception of gifts of visitors to meet the expen...
-The Fifteenth Century. Part 3
We will not pause to describe the armoires, or wardrobes, which are, as a general rule, nothing more than a chest set upon a bench or two chests one on top of the other. From them we may, however, ded...
-The Renaissance
IT is very much the fashion nowadays to deplore the fact that Charles VIII., previously imbued with the Romanesque spirit, should have been so excited by the perusal of the Rosier des Guerres as...
-The Renaissance. Part 2
M. Emile Molinier, who is one of the most learned and expert writers on these subjects, refers in his Histoire generale des Arts appliques a l'lndustrie, apropos of the Chateau of Gaillon to certain...
-The Renaissance. Part 3
If, however, in spite of the reasons we have urged against it, the belief is still retained that the remarkable decorations of these palaces were to a great extent the work of Italians who were living...
-Henri II. And The Second Half Of The Sixteenth Century
THE style which it has become customary to call that of Henri II., because it was inaugurated in the reign of that monarch, who was the son of Francis I., lasted until the beginning of the sevente...
-Henri II. And The Second Half Of The Sixteenth Century. Part 2
Hence the overloading of every engraving with superfluous detail, which no one, we should imagine, would be so unreasonable as to attempt to copy servilely. Plate XI. BED OF DUKE ANTOINE DE LOR...
-Henri II. And The Second Half Of The Sixteenth Century. Part 3
In the dressers made in the reign of Henri IV. we see the final collapse of the school of Du Cerceau but a few years after the death of the founder of the Ile de France school, whereas in the so-calle...
-Henri II. And The Second Half Of The Sixteenth Century. Part 4
In some few examples that have been preserved it is very evident that the artists responsible took their decorative motives from the Dijon and Paris drawings they chanced to come across, combining som...
-The Seventeenth Century Before The Accession Of Louis XIV
Speaking generally, two-thirds of the seventeenth century may be said to have been taken up in a laborious effort on the part of French artists to assimilate all the foreign decorative styles of t...
-The Seventeenth Century Before The Accession Of Louis XIV. Part 2
It is supposed to have belonged to Maria Gonzaga, Queen of Poland, and is of very complicated structure, so overladen with all manner of ornamentation, inlaid and applique in metal and other materials...
-The Seventeenth Century Before The Accession Of Louis XIV. Part 3
After this rapid review of the extraordinarily prolific foreign output, and the raids made on France by it from every side, the danger of being swamped run by French individuality will readily be unde...
-The Seventeenth Century Before The Accession Of Louis XIV. Part 4
It was in such alcoves that, in accordance with the most singular of all the strange fashions we have so far passed in review, ladies - imitating the so-called Precieuses of the Hotel Rambouillet - us...
-The Reign Of Louis XIV
IN the history of art the reign of Louis XIV. does not begin in the year 1643, when he actually ascended the throne at the age of five years, but at the foundation in 1663 of the so-called Manufac...
-The Reign Of Louis XIV. Part 2
Those who are disposed to dispute this have but to run through the incredibly long lists of works for which he himself made the designs or which he executed entirely. Without enumerating them here we ...
-The Reign Of Louis XIV. Part 3
The most highly thought of amongst the Italians who worked for the King were Domenico Cucci and Filippo Caffieri; and although the latter alone is now famous, they seem to have been looked upon as equ...
-The Reign Of Louis XIV. Part 4
It is even probable that there remain a greater number of examples of the former, though they are not attributed to Boulle, than of the latter, on account of their greater durability. Lastly, if Boull...
-The Reign Of Louis XIV. Part 5
The parquet floor is also made of inlaid wood [marquetage] and enriched with various ornaments, such as, amongst others, the monograms of Mon-seigneur and Madame la Dauphine. * Vast apartment with...
-The Regency And Louis XV
NOTHING checked the evolution of French decorative art in the direction so vigorously given to it by the artists patronised by the munificence of Louis XIV. and the wise judgment of Colbert; not e...
-The Regency And Louis XV. Part 2
Before resuming the chronological course of our review, it appears to us fitting to speak of the Martins, a family famous for having evolved out of the lacquer-work imported from China, a very distinc...
-The Regency And Louis XV. Part 3
Now we repeat that Charles Cressent was a true and also a very great sculptor, as capable of turning out a good bust to order, such as the one of Philip of Orleans, originally in the fine cabinet of m...
-Louis XVI., The Revolution And The Empire
IN the preceding chapter we have described only that branch of the Louis XIV. style which culminated and came to an end in the wild efflorescence of the Rocaille pnase, wnicn, however, had also do...
-Louis XVI., The Revolution And The Empire. Part 2
When Jeanne Becu became Com-tesse du Barry she wished to find an artist who would work exclusively for her, and she was advised to choose Gouthiere as designer and decorator. There is nothing to show ...
-Louis XVI., The Revolution And The Empire. Part 3
There is nothing to explain the favour shown by the Marquise de Pompadour to the master of Riesener, and second rank alone would be accorded to him if the inventory of the workshops of Jean Francois O...
-Louis XVI., The Revolution And The Empire. Part 4
Not only did the great Riesener borrow, as we have seen, from contemporary metal founders and chasers, but also, in spite of his having been - as proved by his marqueterie work - a remarkably clever d...
-Louis XVI., The Revolution And The Empire. Part 5
The Revolution put an almost complete stop to the production of articles of luxury. Deprived of commissions from the royal family and the aristocracy, many artists were reduced to complete inactivity ...
-Furniture Reference Books
Adams, G. L. Decorations, Interieures et Meubles des Epoques Louis XIII. et Louis XIV. 100 plates Fol. Paris, 1861. Alvin, L. J. Les Grandes Armoiries du Duc Charles de Bourgogne, gravees vers. 146...







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