White

Procure the best gilders' whiting, as it is well washed and has more body than common whiting, and less lime. It is sold in large lumps and only requires to be broken up and plunged into as much water as will serve to soften it without bringing it into a liquid state. This last remark applies to all the colors when they are put into the stock pots ready for use. "Whiting is used to mix with almost all the colors, to reduce them, in the same way as Flake white is used in oil painting or as water is used in water color drawing.

Flake White

A fine white, very solid, but turns a little brown in distemper, after a short time. It is only used where extra brightness is required and for the highest lights. It is sold in lumps and can be crushed in water with a palette knife to be ready for use.

Zinc White

Very white, but has less body than flake white, though more permanent. In all other respects it is the same and is prepared in the same way for use.

Lemon Chrome

A brilliant light yellow, sold in lumps, and only requires to be crushed as above.

Orange Chrome

A fine rich bright color, in all respects of the same nature as the other chrome.

Dutch Pink

A most useful yellow for distemper painting and mixes well with any other color. It is sold in lumps, but must be ground in water to be ready for use.

Light Yellow Ochre

This is a very useful and cheap color. It is sold in a powdered state and only requires to be plunged into water to be ready for use.

Dark Brown Ochre

Of the same nature as the above and prepared for use in the same way; unfortunately, it is very sandy.

Raw Sienna

A fine rich golden yellow, for glazing, chiefly; sold in broken lumps, very hard, and requires most careful grinding in water to be ready for use. As grinding shall be often spoken of let it be understood that it is always in water.

Orange Lead

A very bright and powerful red, sold in powder; requires only to be plunged in water to be ready for use.

Vermilion

A fine red, sold in powder, and only requires to be plunged in water.

Indian Red

A good color, also sold in powder, and prepared in the same way for use.

Venetian Red

A very cheap and useful color, also in powder, and prepared in the same way for use.

Damp Lake

A useful color in distemper. It is sold in a damp, pulpy state and only requires to be kept damp for use. It is a fine glazing color.

Carmine Paste

A magnificent color, has great power, and is a fine glazing color. This, also, only requires to be kept damp, as it is sold ready for use. It need not be put on the palette till required.

Rose Pink

A useful color, sold in soft lumps, but requires grinding for use.

Brown Lake

A good color, requires grinding.

Burnt Sienna

A fine color, requires most careful grinding. This is a good glazing color.

Vandyke Brown

A fine useful color, is a good glazing one, requires most careful grinding.

Raw Umber

A useful color, requires grinding.

Burnt Umber

A good color, requires grinding, and is a good glazing color.

Drop Black

A very useful color, requires grinding.

Blue Black

Is also useful, requires grinding.

Indigo

A very useful color, very hard, requires to be broken up and steeped in boiling water for some time, then ground up in the usual way. A good glazing color.

German Ultramarine

A good blue, sold in powder, and only requires to be plunged in water.

Prussian Blue

A powerful blue, hitherto scarcely used in distemper, but likely to be of much use. Requires good grinding.

Azure Blue

A fine, useful blue, better than German ultramarine for most purposes. A powder color and has only to be plunged in water.

Blue Verditer

A fine night color, but of a sandy nature, and very difficult to work with. A powder color and requires only water put to it for use.

Dark Green Lake

A most powerful green and very useful. Requires grinding for use.

Light Green Lake

The same as the above, only much lighter.

Emerald Green

A very bright green and should be sparingly used. Requires no grinding, as it is in powder.