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Wood Turning | by George Alexander Ross



This little work is sent out with the hope that it may prove of practical benefit to those into whose hands it may come.

TitleWood Turning
AuthorGeorge Alexander Ross
PublisherGinn And Company
Year1909
Copyright1909, George Alexander Ross
AmazonWood Turning

Prepared For The Use Of Students In Manual Training High Schools, Technical Schools, And Colleges

By George Alexander Ross, Instructor In Woodwork And Pattern Making, Lewis Institute, Chicago

-Preface
The object of these pages is to place before pupils such information as will be of practical help to them in their work in wood turning. It has been the writer's experience that pupils lose confidenc...
-Wood Turning
The art of turning is one of the most ancient of the handicrafts, and is as important as it is ancient. The machine on which the work is performed is called a lathe. Primitive lathes and their develo...
-Wood Turning. Part 2
Fig. 8. The hand wheel F is used to turn the screw in the spindle; the clamp G is used to fasten the spindle in place when once set. On the side of the spindle is a slot (not shown in the figure) ...
-Wood Turning. Part 3
In this lathe the tools are held rigid in the tool post, so that the manipulation in cutting is done by turning the hand wheels on the apron and cross feed. Fig. ii. In Fig. 11 A is shown another ...
-Wood Turning. Part 4
Fig. 14. Before grinding this tool, notice the shape it should have. The end is ground in an elliptical form, the bevel being practically a straight line, as shown at AB, Fig. 14. To grind the gou...
-Exercise I. To Turn A Cylinder Material: Gum Wood, Whitewood, Pine
LIVE CENTER END DEAD CENTER END Fig. 29 No simpler form can be turned than that shown in Fig. 29. It is a plain cylinder, the dimensions of which, when finished, are 5 X 1 3/4. 1 Read instruct...
-Exercise II. To Turn A Stepped Cylinder
Material: Gum wood, whitewood, pine. This exercise begins in the same manner as the first one; the necessary steps to take in working this out are shown in Fig. 42. After the piece is turned to a cyl...
-Exercise III. Socket Chisel Handle
Material: Apple wood, hickory All work turned on the lathe on centers is commenced in the same manner as in Exercises I and II. It will be unnecessary in this manual hereafter to repeat the prelimina...
-Exercise IV. Teapot Stand
Material: Oak, mahogany, cherry, ash, or any hard wood that will finish well In Fig. 47 is shown the working drawing for this piece of work. The methods used are applicable on such work as rosettes a...
-Exercise V. Candlestick
(Templet and Chucking Exercise) Material: Whitewood, birch From the illustration, Fig. 50, we see that there are two pieces to be turned for this article. The upright (Fig. 51), which is turned firs...
-Exercise VI. Mallet
Material: Apple wood or hickory The general drawing, Fig. 60, is what is termed a tabulated drawing; letters instead of figures are used on the drawing. To obtain the dimensions of any of the mallets...
-Exercise VII. Candlestick
Material: Mahogany, birch, cherry, oak, or maple This piece of work (Fig. 63) is made of two parts; the upright being turned between centers and the base on the screw chuck. In turning the beads on...
-Exercise VIII. Napkin Rings
(Bell Chuck Work) Material: Birch, maple, apple, or any close-grained hard wood The methods of turning, given in connection with this exercise, are applicable to hollow work, such as cups, vases, etc...
-Exercise IX. Small Box
Material: Mahogany, birch, cherry The student should always keep in mind that there is usually more than one way in which a piece of work can be made. The method given with this piece is one that is ...
-Exercise X. Smokers' Set
Material: Cherry, birch, oak The design given here is only suggestive; the student may submit an original design to the instructor before undertaking to make this piece. The methods of turning in th...
-Exercise XI. Towel Rails
Material: Birch, oak, ash, cherry, or maple In the figure is shown the assembly drawing of this piece of work. The student should study out the pieces from it, instead of having a detail drawing of e...
-Exercise XII. Rolling Pin
Material: Maple The work that follows in this manual is, to a considerable extent, a repetition of methods previously given; for this reason the sequence in which the drawings are placed need not be ...
-Exercise XIII. Potato Masher
Material: Maple The methods applied on this exercise are practically the same as those given in Exercise XII. In this piece of work long convex curves and short concave curves are the special featur...
-Exercise XIV. Card Receiver
Material: Cherry, oak, mahogany, birch In work of this character it is advisable to use a templet for both the outside and inside. As before stated, when a templet is used, two points are required as...
-Supplementary Exercises
Many useful and ornamental pieces of work can be turned out on the speed lathe; light- and dark-colored woods in combination, formed into designs, are often used to produce effects on turned work that...
-Parted Or Split Work
Methods for turning a piece of split work, such as would be used for decorative purposes on flat surfaces. In Fig. 88 is shown a piece that is semicircular in section, such as would be used in conne...
-Miscellaneous Turned Moldings
Possibly there is no more fascinating work on the lathe than that of rolling a bead or cutting a hollow. Often the beginner, after having had a little practice on the lathe, is at a loss for some ...
-The Art Of Staining And Finishing Woods
There has possibly been no greater progress made in any art in the past few years than that which has been made in the art of staining and finishing woods. This, we believe, is to a great extent the r...
-Fillers
Ready-to-use fillers can be obtained in the open market; they save time. Many materials are used as a base in the making of fillers, such as whiting, cornstarch, silex, flour, etc. The material which...
-Stains
In using chemicals to stain woods it will be found that different pieces of the same kind of wood will take different shades; especially is this true in regard to oak. To obtain an olive green on oak...
-Miscellaneous Recipes
1. Mahogany. Fustic chips, 2 oz.; madder root, 1/4 lb.; water, 1/2 gal. 2. Mahogany. Dissolve archil in water and make it of such strength as will suit; add a little eosin, and apply to the work cold...







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previous page: The Carpenters' Guide | by Harvey Miller
  
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next page: Turning Lathes | by James Lukin