An exception is something reserved from the operation of the deed; that is, it is something which would otherwise pass by the description of the lands to be conveyed.113 For a valid exception,

105 Thomas v. Wyatt, 31 Mo. 188.

106 Ashville Division No. 15 v. Aston, 92 N. C. 578.

107 Webb v. Den, 17 How. 579; Aultman & Taylor Manuf'g Co. v. Richardson, 7 Neb. 1.

108 Games v. Stiles, 14 Pet. 322; Dunn v. Games, 1 Mclean, 321, Fed. Cas. No. 4,176; Erskine v. Davis, 25 111. 251; Franklin v. Talmadge, 5 Johns. (N. Y.) 84. A middle initial may be important when used. See Ambs v. Railway Co., 44 Minn. 266, 46 N. W. 321.

109 Kincaid v. Howe, 10 Mass. 203; Cobb v. Lucas, 15 Pick. (Mass.) 7.

110 Hummelman v. Mounts, 87 Ind. 178; Webb v. Mullins, 78 Ala. 111.

111 Ante, pp. 36, 47, 56.

112 Mckinney v. Settles, 31 Mo. 541.

113 Craig v. Wells, 11 N. Y. 315; Thompson v. Gregory, 4 Johns. (N. Y.) 81; Whitaker v. Brown, 46 Pa. St. 197; Ashcroft v. Railroad Co., 126 Mass. 197; Stockbridge Iron Co. v. Hudson Iron Co., 107 Mass. 290; Wiley v. Sirdorus, 41 Iowa, 224; Sloan v. Furniture Co., 29 Ohio St. 568.

Real Prop.-27 the thing excepted must be described with as much particularity as is required in the description of the land conveyed.114 All rights in the land excepted from the operation of the deed remain in the grantor as they were before the conveyance.115