Babyroussa, Or Babirnsa, an animal of the swine family, peculiar to some of the Malay islands. It is about 3 1/2 ft. long and 2 1/2 ft. high; the legs being longer and the body more slender than in others of the swine species. It does not root in the ground, but lives upon fallen fruits. The tusks of the lower jaw are long and sharp. Those of the upper jaw, instead of growing downward in the usual manner, are reversed, growing upward from bony sockets near the snout, and curving backward until they almost touch the forehead. They sometimes attain the length of 8 or 10 inches, and are found only in the male. Their use is undetermined; they cannot be weapons of offence. Some have supposed that they serve to protect the eyes from the spiny plants among which the animal finds its food; but they would for this purpose be equally necessary for the female, which must seek its food in the same way as the male. From these horn-like tusks, and its comparative lightness of appearance, it derives its Malay name, which signifies the "hog-deer." It is quite as fierce as the wild boar, and an excellent swimmer, often taking to the water for mere pleasure.

Babyroussa (Sua babirusa).

Babyroussa (Sua babirusa).