Bethsaida (Heb., fishing place), the name of two places, as is now generally agreed, of ancient Palestine. One of them is believed to have been situated on the N. W. shore of the lake of Tiberias. Jerome and Eusebius mention Capernaum, Chorazin, Tiberias, and Beth-saida as lying on the shore of Lake Tiberias; and Epiphanius says of Bethsaida and Capernaum that they were not far apart. But the exact position of this Bethsaida has never been indicated, and even the name is unknown to the inhabitants of that part of the country, except such as have learned it from the New Testament. Some writers place it at Khan Minyeh, others, with Robinson, at Ain et-Tabighah; and De Saulcy thinks it was located at Tell Hum. Here was the birthplace of three of Christ's disciples and a frequent resort of Christ himself. The other place appears to have been Bethsaida of Gaulonitis, just above the embouchure of the Jordan into the lake of Tiberias, on the E. side. It was originally a village called Bethsaida, but was rebuilt and enlarged by Philip the tetrarch and named Julias in honor of Julia, daughter of Augustus. This is identified with the place where Christ miraculously fed the 5,000, and where the blind man was restored to sight.

Here also Philip the tetrarch died and was buried.

Bethsaida.

Bethsaida.