Brusa, Or Bronssa(anc. Prusa or Prusias ad Olympum, from being situated at the foot of the Bithynian Olympus), a city of Asia Minor, capital of the Turkish eyalet of Khodavendi-ghiar, 57 m. S. of Constantinople, and 15 m. S. E. of the sea of Marmora; pop. in 1855, 102,907, of whom 64,087 were Mohammedans, .27,173 Greeks, 9,243 Armenians, and 2,404 Jews. It is the residence of a Greek and an Armenian archbishop, and has an extensive trade with Aleppo and Smyrna, chiefly in carpets, cloths, silks, and satins, which are largely manufactured in the town. In the vicinity are noted thermal springs. An earthquake, Feb. 28, 1855, destroyed the greater part of the town, ruined 80 of the finest mosques, and killed 100 of the inhabitants. In antiquity Prusa was the capital of Bithynia, deriving its name from Prusias, one of the early Bithynian kings. Under the Romans it was the residence of Pliny the Younger and of other Roman governors. Wrested from the hands of the Greek emperors by Orkhan, the son of the founder of the Ottoman dynasty, it became the seat of the new empire, till Amu-rath I. removed the seat of government to Adrianople. The tombs of the ancient sultans, the mosques, of which there were about 200, and other remarkable buildings, handsome bath houses, a vast number of private and public fountains, fine gardens, extensive bazaars, and the superb view from Mount Olympus, all contributed to enhance the beauty of the town.

But since the earthquake most of the public buildings have been in ruins.

Brusa.

Brusa.