Proctor (Lat. procurator, agent), in a general sense, one who is commissioned to manage the business of another. In a particular sense, a proctor is one who is commissioned to transact the business of his principal in the ecclesiastical or admiralty courts. He discharges functions similar to those of attorneys and solicitors in other courts. In England, the proctor can be admitted to practice only after a clerkship of seven years with a senior proctor of at least five years' standing, and he must produce a certificate of considerable proficiency in classical education. Before the abolition of the probate and matrimonial courts of doctors' commons, the proctors were the only persons allowed to practise in them. (See Doctors' Commons.) Proctors are known in the United States only as officers of the courts of admiralty, whose duties, authority, and responsibilities correspond to those of attorneys at law. - The name proctor is also given in England, and in some American colleges, to university officers whose duty is to guard morals and order.