Putnam, the name of counties in nine of the United States.

I. A S. E. County Of New York

A S. E. County Of New York, bordered W. by the Hudson river, E. by Connecticut, and watered by Croton river and Peekskill creek; area, 234 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 15,420. Its surface is mountainous, several ranges crossing the county from S. W. to N. E., and the deep valleys are fertile. There are several beautiful mountain lakes, the principal of which are Mahopac, Canopus, and Gleneida. Iron, granite, limestone, and other minerals are found in the mountains, and there are many mines and quarries. It is traversed by the Hudson River and the New York and Harlem railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 2,599 bushels of wheat, 89,934 of Indian corn, 49,673 of oats, 101,595 of potatoes, 33,671 tons of hay, 3,707 lbs. of wool, and 277,759 of butter. There were 2,184 horses, 10,220 milch cows, 1,480 working oxen, 2,141 other cattle, 2,119 sheep, and 2,015 swine; 3 flour mills, 3 paper mills, 2 founderies, and 5 manufactories of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware. Capital, Carmel.

II. A W. County Of West Virginia

A W. County Of West Virginia, touching the Ohio with its W. corner, intersected by the Great Kanawha, and drained by its tributaries; area, about 350 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,794, of whom 260 were colored. It has a rough and hilly surface and a generally fertile soil, and contains extensive beds of iron ore and bituminous coal. The Chesapeake and Ohio railroad crosses the S. corner. The chief productions in 1870 were 40,020 bushels of wheat, 232,126 of Indian com, 49,879 of oats, 28,090 of potatoes, 472,765 lbs. of tobacco, 14,992 of wool, 63,061 of butter, and 19,541 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 1,463 horses, 1,565 milch cows, 3,035 other cattle, 6,291 sheep, and 6,999 swine. Capital, Winfield.

III. A Central County Of Georgia

A Central County Of Georgia, bordered E. by the Oconee and drained by Little river and several creeks; area, about 350 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,461, of whom 7,445 were colored. It has a nearly level surface, abounding with forests of oak and pine, and a soil naturally fertile. The Milledgeville branch of the Central railway of Georgia terminates at Eatonton. The chief productions in 1870 were 11,040 bushels of wheat, 160,661 of Indian corn, 7,872 of oats, 14,848 of sweet potatoes, 7,326 bales of cotton, 3,328 lbs. of wool, and 29,047 of butter. There were 464 horses, 1,100 mules and asses, 1,541 milch cows, 465 working oxen, 2,250 other cattle, 1,538 sheep, and 4,346 swine. Capital, Eaton-ton.

IV. An E. County Of Florida

An E. County Of Florida, bounded E. by St. John's river and drained by its tributaries; area, 610 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,821, of whom 1,334 were colored. The surface is low and level, and the soil fertile. It contains several small lakes. The chief productions in 1870 were 16,592 bushels of Indian corn, 11,-673 of sweet potatoes, 162 bales of cotton, 1,125 lbs. of rice, and 4,823 gallons of molasses. There were 1,055 milch cows, 5,526 other cattle, 360 sheep, and 2,710 swine. Capital, Palatka.

V. A N. County Of Tennessee

A N. County Of Tennessee, drained by affluents of the Cumberland river; area, about 500 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 8,698, of whom 530 were colored. It has a hilly surface, and much of it is covered by forests. The chief productions in 1870 were 39,330 bushels of wheat, 332,254 of Indian corn, 37,-854 of oats, 17,367 of Irish and 11,581 of sweet potatoes, 131,856 lbs. of tobacco, 19,092 of wool, 125,938 of butter, 18,945 of honey, and 17,772 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 2,218 horses, 2,166 milch cows, 1,364 working oxen, 2,865 other cattle, 10,460 sheep, and 21,568 swine. Capital, Cookville.

VI. A N. W. County Of Ohio

A N. W. County Of Ohio, drained by Auglaize river and its tributaries, the Ottawa and Blanchard's fork; area, about 500 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 17,081. It has a level surface, is covered with large tracts of timber, and its soil is fertile. It is intersected by the Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 237,586 bushels of wheat, 434,948 of Indian corn, 105,896 of oats, 70,527 of potatoes, 16,331 tons of hay, 78,605 lbs. of wool, 330,078 of butter, 14,098 of maple sugar, and 12,801 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 5,437 horses, 5,242 milch cows, 7,191 other cattle, 23,269 sheep, and 15,466 swine; 8 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 1 woollen mill, 6 flour mills, and 14 saw mills. Capital, Ottawa.

VII. A W. County Of Indiana

A W. County Of Indiana, drained by a branch of Eel river and several creeks; area, 486 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 21,514. It has an undulating surface and fertile soil. It is intersected by the Indianapolis and Illinois canal and several railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 297,797 bushels of wheat, 988,-919 of Indian corn, 68,565 of oats, 57,710 of potatoes, 15,990 tons of hay, 125,320 lbs. of wool, 332,383 of butter, 33,289 of maple sugar, and 21,207 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 8,274 horses, 2,416 mules and asses, 5,729 milch cows, 19,236 other cattle, 34,227 sheep, and 26,777 swine; 16 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 3 of furniture, 2 of curried leather, 3 of pumps, 6 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 3 founderies, 1 woollen mill, 4 flour mills, and 16 saw mills. Capital, Green-castle.

VIII. A N. Central County Of Illinois

A N. Central County Of Illinois, intersected by the Illinois river and drained by its branches; area, 200 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 6,280. It has an undulating surface and fertile soil. It is traversed by the Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 28,933 bushels of wheat, 334,259 of Indian corn, 86,519 of oats, 73,707 of potatoes, 10,571 lbs. of wool, 47,699 of butter, 4,916 gallons of sorghum molasses, and 5,080 tons of hay. There were 2,420 horses, 1,406 milch cows, 2,899 other cattle, 1,987 sheep, and 5,431 swine. Capital, Hennepin.

IX. A N. County Of Missouri

A N. County Of Missouri, bordering on Iowa, bounded E. by the Chariton river and drained by its branches; area, about 550 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 11,217, of whom 9 were colored. It has an undulating surface, diversified by prairies and forests, and a fertile soil. The chief productions in 1870 were 62,308 bushels of wheat, 458,582 of Indian corn, 146,-152 of oats, 34,979 of potatoes, 12,911 tons of hay, 39,200 lbs. of tobacco, 63,800 of wool, 194,098 of butter, 10,885 of cheese, 26,365 of honey, and 32,483 gallons of sorghum and 14,-731 of maple molasses. There were 5,329 horses, 515 mules and asses, 4,137 milch cows, 9,351 other cattle, 26,227 sheep, and 21,789 swine. Capital, Unionville.