Randolph, the name of counties in eight of the United States.

I. A N. E. County Of West Virginia

A N. E. County Of West Virginia, drained by the sources of the Monon-gahela river; area, about 1,200 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 5,563, of whom 103 were colored. A range of the Alleghanies runs along its E. border, and several parallel ranges extend within its limits; the soil in the valleys is fertile. Coal, iron, salt, limestone, and other minerals abound. The chief productions in 1870 were 8,969 bushels of wheat, 59,758 of Indian corn, 33,237 of oats, 7,298 tons of hay, 2,133 lbs. of tobacco, 17,706 of wool, 90,840 of butter, 41,434 of maple sugar, and 3,603 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 1,525 horses, 1,970 milch cows, 6,503 other cattle, 8,523 sheep, and 2,834 swine. Capital, Beverly.

II. A Central County Of North Carolina

A Central County Of North Carolina, drained by Deep river and by the Uharie, a tributary of the Yadkin; area, 725 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 17,551, of whom 2,606 were colored. The surface is rolling and the soil generally fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 137,427 bushels of wheat, 264.924 of Indian corn, 95,681 of oats, 18,880 of Irish and 23,-125 of sweet potatoes, 24,399 lbs. of tobacco, 26,050 of wool, 121,618 of butter, and 4,346 tons of hay. There were 2,844 horses, 772 mules and asses, 4,787 milch cows, 839 working oxen, 6,290 other cattle, 17,101 sheep, and 23,387 swine. Capital, Ashborough.

III. A S. W. County Of Georgia

A S. W. County Of Georgia, separated from Alabama by the Chattahoochee, intersected by Pataula creek, and drained by branches of Flint river; area, about 400 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,561, of whom 5,477 were colored. It has a nearly level surface, and a very fertile soil in the river bottoms. It is traversed by the Southwestern railroad of Georgia. The chief productions in 1870 were 184,-940 bushels of Indian corn, 25,457 of sweet potatoes, 5,748 bales of cotton, 2,215 lbs. of wool, and 9,165 gallons of molasses. There were 574 horses, 962 mules and asses, 1,553 milch cows, 2,803 other cattle, 1,143 sheep, and 9,540 swine. Capital, Cuthbert.

IV. An E. County Of Alabama

An E. County Of Alabama, bordering on Georgia, intersected by the Tallapoosa river; area, about 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 12,006, of whom 1,641 were colored. It has an uneven surface and a generally fertile soil. Gold is found. The chief productions in 1870 were 48,587 bushels of wheat, 264,448 of Indian corn, 20,707 of oats, 37,758 of sweet potatoes, 2,246 bales of cotton, 7,667 lbs. of tobacco, 13,262 of wool, 125,066 of butter, and 8,188 gallons of cane and 4,804 of sorghum molasses. There were 1,313 horses, 845 mules and asses, 3,062 milch cows, 1,751 working oxen, 5,047 other cattle, 7,485 sheep, and 14,819 swine. Capital, Weldonville.

V. A N. E. County Of Arkansas

A N. E. County Of Arkansas, bordering on Missouri and drained by branches of Black river; area, about 850 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,466, of whom 357 were colored. Its surface is generally level and the soil fertile. It is intersected by the Cairo and Fulton railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 16,733 bushels of wheat, 265,990 of Indian corn, 18,293 of oats, 11,130 lbs. of tobacco, 7,643 of wool, and 57,450 of butter. There were 757 horses, 1,472 milch cows, 2,706 other cattle, 2,507 sheep, and 8,658 swine. Capital, Pocahontas.

VI. An E. County Of Indiana

An E. County Of Indiana, bordering on Ohio, and drained by White, Mississinewa, and Whitewater rivers; area, about 400 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 22,862. It has an undulating surface and fertile soil. It is intersected by several railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 535,003 bushels of wheat, 740,051 of Indian corn, 147,992 of oats, 10,088 of flax seed, 9,208 tons of hay, 73,019 lbs. of wool, 349,327 of butter, and 36,914 gallons of maple molasses. There were 8,485 horses, 6,094 milch cows, 8,571 other cattle, 25,154 sheep, and 32,590 swine; 5 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 9 of furniture, 2 of wagon material, 1 of woollen goods, 4 tanneries, 7 flour mills, and 19 saw mills. Capital, Winchester.

VII. A S. W. County Of Illinois

A S. W. County Of Illinois, separated from Missouri by the Mississippi river, intersected by the Kas-kaskia, and drained by several small streams; area, about 500 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 20,859. It has an undulating and hilly surface and a generally fertile soil. It is intersected by the St. Louis, Belleville, and Southern Illinois, and the Chester and Tamaroa railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 1,031,472 bushels of wheat, 510,080 of Indian corn, 414,487 of oats, 107,049 of Irish and 11,362 of sweet potatoes, 11,097 tons of hay, 3,572 lbs. of tobacco, 35,731 of wool, 109,184 of butter, and 42,345 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 6,972 horses, 1,209 mules and asses, 4,619 milch cows, 5,351 other cattle, 12,180 sheep, and 24,590 swine; 2 manufactories of agricultural implements, 19 of carriages and wagons, 10 of saddlery and harness, 3 of woollen goods, 3 breweries, 10 flour mills, and 4 saw mills. Capital, Chester.

VIII. A N. County Of Missouri

A N. County Of Missouri, intersected by the E. fork of Chariton river and drained by several other streams; area, about 450 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 15,908, of whom 2,134 were colored. It has a nearly level surface and a very fertile soil. It is intersected by the St. Louis, Kansas City, and Northern railroad'. The chief productions in 1870 were 82,538 bushels of wheat, 22,361 of rye, 594,372 of Indian corn, 209,013 of oats, 7,929 tons of hay, 873,776 lbs. of tobacco, 63,623 of wool, 150,737 of butter, 22,435 of honey, and 15,169 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 7,155 horses, 2,203 mules and asses, 4,380 milch cows, 7,133 other cattle, 21,770 sheep, and 25,714 swine; 3 flour mills, and 6 saw mills. Capital, Huntsville.