Richland, the name of counties in six of the United States.

I. A Central County Of South Carolina

A Central County Of South Carolina, bordered W. and S. W. by the Congaree river and E. by the Wateree, and drained by their branches; area, 465 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 23,025, of whom 15,177 were colored. It has a somewhat hilly surface, with pine forests, and a fertile soil. Several railroads terminate at Columbia. The chief productions in 1870 were 121,495 bushels of Indian corn, 12,805 of sweet potatoes, 2,565 tons of hay, 5,453 bales of cotton, 26,823 lbs. of rice, and 1,082 of wool. There were 623 horses, 990 mules and asses, 1,367 milch cows, 2,623 other cattle, 1,063 sheep, and 5,579 swine; 1 manufactory of railroad cars, 3 of iron castings, 5 of machinery, 1 of cotton-seed oil, 7 flour mills, and 4 saw mills. Capital, Columbia, which is also the capital of the state.

II. A N. E. Parish Of Louisiana

A N. E. Parish Of Louisiana, drained by Bayou Boeuf and other streams; area, about 550 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 5,110, of whom 2,705 were colored. The surface is low and level and the soil highly productive. It is traversed by the North Louisiana and Texas railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 95,225 bushels of Indian corn, 3,235 of peas and beans, 19,839 of sweet potatoes, and 6,051 bales of cotton. There were 958 horses, 653 mules and asses, 2,829 milch cows, 2,968 other cattle, 1,843 sheep, and 11,094 swine. Capital, Rayville.

III. A N. County Of Ohio

A N. County Of Ohio, drained by the head waters of the Walhonding river; area, about 450 sq. m.; pop in 1870, 32,516. It has an undulating surface and a fertile soil. Several railroads centre at the county seat. The chief productions in 1870 were 588,575 bushels of wheat, 621,381 of Indian corn, 700,830 of oats, 113,877 of potatoes, 36,740 tons of hay, 269,981 lbs. of wool, 833,005 of butter, and 58,543 of maple sugar. There were 8,580 horses, 8,979 milch cows, 10,091 other cattle, 71,093 sheep, and 25,116 swine; 5 manufactories of agricultural implements, 6 of brick, 24 of carriages and wagons, 12 of men's clothing, 12 of furniture, 3 of machinery, 4 of sash, doors, and blinds, 10 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 9 of woollen goods, 8 iron founderies, 14 tanneries, 3 breweries, 22 flour mills, and 11 saw mills. Capital, Mansfield.

IV. A S. E. County Of Illinois

A S. E. County Of Illinois, drained by tributaries of the Wabash river; area, about 375 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 12,803. It has a nearly level surface and a fertile soil. It is intersected by the Ohio and Mississippi railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 150,268 bushels of wheat, 482,594 of Indian corn, 204,634 of oats, 11,422 tons of hay, 2,000 lbs. of tobacco, 31,612 of wool, 87,166. of butter, and 8,080 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 3, 254 horses, 2,723 milch cows, 4,054 other cattle, 12,447 sheep, and 12,256 swine; 3 manufactories of furniture, 2 of sash, doors, and blinds, 4 saw mills, and 2 flour mills. Capital, Olney.

V. A S. W. County Of Wisconsin

A S. W. County Of Wisconsin, bordered S. by Wisconsin river and drained by Pine river and Knapp's and Mill creeks; area, 576 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 15,731. It has a generally level surface and a fertile soil. The Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul railroad skirts the S. border. The chief productions in 1870 were 189,900 bushels of wheat, 345,-787 of Indian corn, 183,952 of oats, 108,926 of potatoes, 17,349 tons of hay, 9,126 lbs. of tobacco, 68,573 of wool, 316,734 of butter, 25,544 of cheese, and 350,436 of hops. There were 3,719 horses, 4,668 milch cows, 1,117 working oxen, 5,715 other cattle, 21,014 sheep, and 13,113 swine; 2 manufactories of furniture, 6 of carriages and wagons, 5 flour mills, and 8 saw mills. Capital, Richland Centre.

VI. An E. County Of Dakota

An E. County Of Dakota, recently formed and not included in the census of 1870; area, about 1,400 sq. m. It is separated from Minnesota by Red river, and is watered by its affluents. The river bottoms are fertile; the rest of the county consists of rolling prairies.