Sanderling, a wading bird of the genus calidris (Cuv.), differing from the sandpipers (tringa, Linn.) chiefly in the absence of the hind toe. The common sanderling is the C. arenaria (Ill.), inhabiting the temperate re-gions of America and Europe; it is from 7 3/4 to 8 in. long, with an alar extent of 12 1/2 in., the bill 1 in. and the tarsus the same, and the weight 1 3/4 oz. The plumage above is ashy gray with lighter edges, with spots of brownish black on the head and back, and with fine transverse lines on the rump and upper tail coverts; under parts pure white; shoulders brownish black without spots; quills with white shafts; the greater wing coverts widely tipped and the middle tail feathers edged with white; bill and legs greenish black; the bill is straight, a little widened at the end; the tail is doubly emarginated, the middle feathers the longest; both sexes are alike; in the spring the plumage is more or less tinged and edged with yellowish red. It is abundant from the Atlantic to the Pacific, in winter going to the southern states and to South America. The European bird presents no certain distinguishing marks from the American.

Common Sanderling (Calidris arenaria).

Common Sanderling (Calidris arenaria).