Scott, the name of 11 counties in the United States.

I. A S. W. County Of Virginia

A S. W. County Of Virginia, bounded S. by Tennessee and intersected by Clinch river and the N. fork of Holston river; area, about 450 sq. m.; pop. in 1870,13,036, of whom 524 were colored. The Clinch mountain and several parallel ridges traverse it. The soil is generally good, and adapted to grazing. Bituminous coal and iron abound. The "Natural Tunnel," perforated through a lofty ridge by a branch of the Clinch river, is in this county. The chief productions in 1870 were 53,583 bushels of wheat, 222,254 of Indian corn, 68,-730 of oats, 16,557 lbs. of tobacco, 24,249 of wool, 95,354 of butter, 6,645 of flax, 31,818 of maple sugar, 22,539 of honey, and 13,980 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 2,528 horses, 2,991 milch cows, 4,430 other cattle, 13,415 sheep, and 10,076 swine. Capital, Es-tillville.

II. A Central County Of Mississippi

A Central County Of Mississippi, drained by several tributaries of Pearl river; area, about 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,847, of whom 3,167 were colored. There are large forests of pine, and the soil is sandy and sterile. It is intersected by the Vicksburg and Meridian railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 131,775 bushels of Indian corn, 9,450 of oats, and 3,560 bales of cotton. There were 988 horses, 567 mules and asses, 2,343 milch cows, 956 working oxen, 3,296 other cattle, 2,399 sheep, and 11,429 swine. Capital, Hillsboro.

III. A W. County Of Arkansas

A W. County Of Arkansas, drained by the Fourche la Fave, Petit Jean, and other tributaries of the Arkansas river; area, about 800 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,483, of whom 121 were colored. The surface is uneven and the soil generally fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 13,141 bushels of wheat, 304,408 of Indian corn, 9,940 of oats, 30,411 lbs. of tobacco, 3,128 of wool, 71,530 of butter, and 678 bales of cotton. There are 2,514 horses, 296 mules and asses, 3,057 milch cows, 1,218 working oxen, 4,374 other cattle, 2,268 sheep, and 21,753 swine. Capital, Waldron.

IV. A N. E. County Of Tennessee

A N. E. County Of Tennessee, bordering on Kentucky, and drained by the Big South fork of the Cumberland river; area, 300 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,054. It is traversed by the Cumberland mountains, and has an abundance of timber and coal. The chief productions in 1870 Were 88,311 bushels of Indian corn, 17,793 of oats, 9,283 lbs. of tobacco, 12,560 of wool, 71,-810 of butter, and 22,268 of honey. There were 824 horses, 1,400 milch cows, 2,537 other cattle, 6,589 sheep, and 13,189 swine. Capital, Huntsville.

V. A N. County Of Kentucky

A N. County Of Kentucky, drained by tributaries of the Kentucky river; area, 240 sq. m.; pop. in 1870,11,607, of whom 3,955 were colored. The surface is generally hilly and the soil extremely fertile. Fine blue limestone is found in great abundance. The Louisville, Cincinnati, and Lexington railroad crosses the S. portion. The chief productions in 1870 were 47,770 bushels of wheat, 26,774 of rye, 573,620 of Indian corn, 76,156 of oats, 32,900 lbs. of tobacco, 31,329 of wool, 70,499 of butter, and 10,338 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 3,728 horses, 1,413 mules and asses, 2,242 milch cows, 5,171 other cattle, 7,743 sheep, and 16,397 swine. Capital, Georgetown.

VI. A S. E. County Of Indiana

A S. E. County Of Indiana, drained by affluents of White river; area, about 200 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,873. The surface is flat, except in the west, where are some high hills called the Knobs. The soil is good. The Ohio and Mississippi and the Jeffersonville, Madison, and Indianapolis railroads traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were 41,756 bushels of wheat, 213,475 of Indian corn, 69,-235 of oats, 5,729 tons of hay, 16.700 lbs. of tobacco, 28,007 of wool, 131,080 of butter, and 30,814 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 2,342 horses, 1,509 milch cows, 2,309 other cattle, 9,652 sheep, and 8,815 swine; 5 manufactories of carriages and wagons, and 11 saw mills. Capital, Lexington.

VII. A W. County Of Illinois

A W. County Of Illinois, bounded W. by Illinois river and intersected by Plume and other creeks; area, 255 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,530. The surface is mostly level and well timbered, and the soil very fertile. Coal and limestone abound. It is traversed by the Rockford, Rock Island, and Pacific, and the Toledo, Wabash, and Westera railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 266,123 bushels of wheat, 752,771 of Indian corn, 13,462 of oats, 12,457 of potatoes, 4,735 tons of hay, 21,174 lbs. of wool, and 45,-570 of butter. There were 3,257 horses, 2,151 milch cows, 5,958 other cattle, 6,077 sheep, and 17,285 swine; 5 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 5 of stone and earthen ware, and 4 saw mills. Capital, Winchester.

VIII. A S. E. County Of Minnesota

A S. E. County Of Minnesota, bounded N. W. by the Minnesota river; area, about 420 sq. m.; pop. in 1870,11,042. The surface is undulating, with a variety of prairie land and large forests, and the soil is fertile. Timber is a valuable product. The St. Paul and Sioux City and the Hastings and Dakota railroads traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were 362,406 bushels of wheat, 186,012 of Indian corn, 165,247 of oats, 19,700 tons of hay, 13,446 lbs. of wool, 319,142 of butter, and 8,750 of hops. There were 2,042 horses, 4,262 milch cows, 6,993 other cattle, 3,863 sheep, and 6,654 swine; 3 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 3 of lime, 1 railroad repair shop, 4 breweries, and 5 saw mills. Capital, Shoka-pee.

IX. An E. County Of Iowa

An E. County Of Iowa, bounded E. and S. by the Mississippi, which separates it from Illinois, and N. by the Wapsipinicon; area, 450 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 38,599. It has an elevated, rolling surface, thinly timbered, and a fertile soil. Coal and limestone are found. It is traversed by the Davenport and St. Paul railroad, and the Iowa division of the Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific. The chief productions in 1870 were 620,954 bushels of wheat, 1,855,226 of Indian corn, 538,102 of oats, 638,440 of barley, 361,647 of potatoes, 34,376 tons of hay, 13,635 lbs. of wool, 702,-706 of butter, 55,640 of cheese, and 11,726 of honey. There were 9,386 horses, 9,846 milch cows, 11,771 other cattle, 3,721 sheep, and 32,757 swine; 5 manufactories of agricultural implements, 1 of boats, 5 of brick, 26 of carriages and wagons, 19 of men's clothing, 4 of cooperage, 13 of furniture, 3 of iron castings, 3 of lime, 13 of saddlery and harness, 16 of cigars, 1 of woollen goods, 8 flour mills, 7 saw mills, and 9 breweries. Capital, Davenport.

X. A S. E. County Of Missouri

A S. E. County Of Missouri, separated from Illinois by the Mississippi river; area, about 400 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,317, of whom 326 were colored. The surface is uneven, and the soil generally fertile. There are vast cypress swamps in the S. part. It is traversed by the St. Louis and Columbus division of the St. Louis and Iron Mountain railroad, and the Cairo, Arkansas, and Texas railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 77,020 bushels of wheat, 428,857 of Indian corn, 19,291 of oats, 22,659 of potatoes, 6,440 lbs. of tobacco, 4,932 of wool, and 6,531 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 1,780 horses, 764 mules and asses, 1,777 milch cows, 2,687 other cattle, 3,225 sheep, and 17,343 swine; 1 flour mill, and 6 saw mills. Capital, Benton.

XI. An Unorganized W. County Of Kansas

An Unorganized W. County Of Kansas, watered by affluents of Smoky Hill river and of Walnut creek, a tributary of the Arkansas; area, 720 sq. m. The surface is rolling and the soil fertile.