Scuppaug, a spiny-rayed fish of the family sparidoe and genus pagrus (Cuv.); it is also called scup and porgy in some localities. In this family the gill covers are shining and scaly, and unarmed; the palate without teeth and the jaws not protractile; the spinous rays of the dorsal and anal fins bare, and received when depressed in grooves at their base; pectorals and ventrals sharp-pointed; branchios-tegal rays six; the scales large and thin, broader than long, the centre of growth being near the posterior border. In pagrus the molars are rounded and in two rows, and the front teeth conical with a villiform card-like band behind them. There are more than a dozen species in the Mediterranean and Red seas, and the East Indian and S. Pacific archipelagos. The common species on the American coast (P. argyrops, Cuv.) attains a length of 8 to 12 in.; when first taken from the water it is pinkish or flesh-colored above and silvery below; about the eyes reddish; a narrow green ridge at the base of the dorsal, and one just back of the eyes; iris mostly silvery; dorsal reddish, with the anterior rays silvery; the body is much compressed toward the back, which is high; the lips large and loose; caudal deeply forked; there is a large purple scale at the beginning of the lateral line.

The food consists of cuttle fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and sea weeds. It is found from Massachusetts to South Carolina, and is largely used as food in a fresh state. The P. vulgaris (Cuv.) of the Mediterranean is about the same size, silvery, with reddish tinges or bars on the back; its flesh is highly esteemed; it was known as the phagros by Aristotle, and was placed in the old genus sparus (Linn.) until separated by Cuvier; it is not found in northern waters.

Scuppaug or Porgy (Pagrus argyrops).

Scuppaug or Porgy (Pagrus argyrops).