Scurvy Grass, a plant of the mustard family, so called originally on account of its supposed antiscorbutic properties, cochlearia officinalis (Lat. cochlear, a spoon, from the shape of the leaves), found on the seacoast of Great Britain and all around the Arctic circle. It is a low, smooth annual or biennial, with a rosette of heart-shaped root leaves; flower stalks 6 to 12 in. high, with numerous small white flowers. The odor of the leaves when bruised is unpleasant, and the taste acrid and bitter; it is sometimes eaten as a salad, but more from some supposed medicinal effect than for its palata-bleness. It is sometimes cultivated in Europe. - The plant called scurvy grass in Pennsylvania and southward is a native of this country as well as of Europe, where it is known as winter cress, Barbarea vulgaris; it is common in low grounds, has dark green leaves, and produces its yellow flowers in early spring. A small variety of it (formerly called B. proecox) is sometimes cultivated, and is sold in the markets as water cress, to which it is much inferior in flavor.

Scurvy Grass (Cochlearia officinalis).

Scurvy Grass (Cochlearia officinalis).