Sir Robert Strange, an English engraver, born in Pomona, one of the Orkney isles, July 14, 1721, died in London, July 5, 1792. While an apprentice in Edinburgh he joined the forces of the young pretender, and after the battle of Culloden took refuge in the highlands. He studied abroad for some years, and in 1751 settled in London as a historical engraver. During a visit to the continent in 1760 he executed many plates after the old masters. He was also a picture dealer, amassed a fortune, and was knighted in 1787. He wrote a "History of the Progress of Engraving," never published. There is a memoir of him by James Dennistoun of Dennistoun (2 vols. 8vo, 1855). STRASBURG, or Strassburg (Fr. Strasbourg), a city of Germany, capital of Alsace-Lorraine, formerly of the French department of Bas-Rhin, on the 111, a tributary of the Rhine, about a mile from the latter river, 90 m. S. S. W. of Frankfort, and 250 m. E. by S. of Paris; pop. in 1876,'94,000, two fifths Protestants. It stands on level ground, is nearly 6 m. in circuit, and is defended by a wail with bastions, ditches, and outworks, and a strong citadel constructed by Vauban. It is entered by seven gates, and the Rhine is crossed by a bridge of boats opposite Kehl. The 111 flows through the town in a N. E. direction, has many branches, and is crossed by several wooden bridges.

The streets are generally crooked and narrow, but the principal ones are broad, and there are several fine squares. The houses are well built and rather loftv, with steep roofs. The cathedral, one of the finest Gothic buildings in Europe (see Cathedral), was much damaged during the siege of 1870, but soon restored. It has a famous astronomical clock, constructed by Isaac Ha-brecht about 1570, one of the greatest works of its kind. Of the other churches the most interesting are those of St. Stephen, St. Thomas, the Temple Neuf, and St. Pierre le Jeune; and there is a fine synagogue. The city library, dating from 1531, was burned in 1870, during the war, with its 200,000 volumes; but it has since been restored, and in 1874 contained 300,000 and in 1875 350,000 volumes. The university, founded in 1621, was reopened May 1, 1872, by the Germans, and in 1875 had more than 700 students. The military establishments are on an extensive scale. The manufactures include woollen, linen, and cotton goods, sail cloth, jewelry, clocks and watches, cutlery, hardware and cast-iron articles, porcelain, earthenware, soap, leather, straw goods, hosiery, paper, and cards.

There are numerous bleach fields, dye works, sugar refineries, breweries, and printing offices; and the town is celebrated for its pates de Foie gras. The trade of Strasburg is extensive, and is greatly facilitated by the navigation of the Rhine. - Strasburg occupies the site of the ancient Argentoratum, which after the Roman conquest was made a frontier fortress against the Germans. It was a free city of the empire during the middle ages, and was a Protestant city till seized by Louis XIV. in 1681. A Catholic bishopric of Strasburg, however, at the same time ruled a considerable territory on both sides of the Rhine. After about one month's siege and bombardment, the commander, Gen. Uhrich, capitulated to the Germans in the night of Sept, 27-28, 1870; and the city was finally incorporated with the German empire by the treaty of May 10, 1871. The fortifications as well as the town have since been much enlarged. - See Friese, Vaterlandisclie Gescliichte der Stadt Strasburg (4 vols., Strasburg, 1791-'5); Hermann, Notices historiques, statistiques et litteraires sur la ville de Strasbourg (2 vols., 1819); Documents relatifs au siege de Stras-bourg, by Gen. Uhrich (Paris, 1872); Geschieli te der Belagerung von Strassburg im Jalire 1870, from German official sources, by Reinhard Wagner (2 vols., Berlin, 1874); and the account of the siege in vol. ix. of the history of the war published by the German general staff (1875).

Strasburg Cathedral.

Strasburg Cathedral.