Sir William Jackson Hooker, an English botanist, born in Norwich in 1785, died Aug. 12, 1865. He manifested a taste for botany at an unusually early age, and in 1809 he visited Iceland for the purpose of studying its natural history. The collection made with great pains during this visit was subsequently lost, but his copious notes and excellent memory enabled him to give an account of the botany of that region in his "Tour in Iceland in 1809" (Yarmouth, 1811; 2d ed., 2 vols. 8vo, London, 1813). He was subsequently engaged at different times in editing a continuation of Cur-tis's "Botanical Magazine," from 1830 to 1833 the "Botanical Miscellany," and from 1834 to 1851 the "London Journal of Botany." He was for a long time professor of botany in the university of Glasgow, and afterward became director of the royal gardens at Kew, in which post he was succeeded at his death by his son Joseph Dalton Hooker. He was knighted in 1836. Among his numerous works are: "British Jungermanniae" (4to, London, 1816; 2d ed., 1846); "Muscologia Britannica" (1818; enlarged, 1855); "Flora Scotica" (1821); "The Exotic Flora" (3 vols., 1823-'7); "Icones Plantarum" (10 vols., 1836-'54); "Flora Bo-reali-Americana" (2 vols. 4to, 1829-'40); "British Flora" (1830; 7th ed., 1855); "Companion to the Botanical Magazine" (2 vols., 1835-'6); "Icones Filicum" (with the assistance of Greville, 1829-'31); "Botany of Capt.

Beechey's Voyage" (1831-41); "Genera of Ferns " (1838-'42); " Notes on the Botany of the Antarctic Voyage of Sir James 0. Ross" (1843); "Species Filicum" (3 vols., 1846-'53); "Guide to Kew Gardens" (1847); "Century of Orchidaceous Plants" (1846); "Victoria Regia" (1851); "Century of Ferns" (1854); "Filices Exoticae" (1859); "British Ferns," and "Second Century of Ferns" (1861); and "Garden Ferns " (1862).