Stratford-Upon-Avon, a town of Warwickshire, England, on the right side of the river Avon, 8 m. S. W. of Warwick, and 82 m. N. W. of London; pop. in 1871, 3,863. The town exhibits the architecture of the 16th and 17th centuries. Annual fairs are held for the sale of horses, cattle, corn, and cheese. Stratford was a place of some consequence as early as the middle of the 8th century, but derives its chief interest now from the fact that it was the birthplace of Shakespeare, his abode in youth and age, and the place of his death and burial. A part of the ancient house in which he is said to have been born, and which he retained to the time of his death, is still standing in Henley street; it has been purchased for the nation by subscription at a cost of about £4,000, and is as far as possible kept in the same condition as in his lifetime. A church near the river, a handsome cruciform structure with a fine tower and spire, contains his remains and those of his wife, in the vicinity of a monument, the distinguishing feature of which is the celebrated portrait bust of Shakespeare in marble. This edifice was thoroughly restored in 1840. The grammar school, in which, according to tradition, the great dramatist was educated, is established in the upper part of the ancient guildhall.

In 1769 a Shakespeare "jubilee" was celebrated in Stratford under the direction of Garrick, on which occasion the present town hall, wliich contains a statue of the poet, was erected. The tercentenary of Shakespeare's birth was celebrated hero, April 23, 1864.

Shakespeare's Birthplace.

Shakespeare's Birthplace.

Shakespeare's Tomb.

Shakespeare's Tomb.