Tebriz, Or Tauris Tabriz, a walled city of Persia, capital of the province of Azerbijan, in lat. 38° 4' N., Ion. 46° 15' E., near the river Aji; pop. about 120,000. It stands on a wide plain, 4,944 ft. above the sea, enclosed on all sides but the west by low mountains or hills. The vicinity is very fertile, and beautified by innumerable fruit gardens, celebrated for their peaches and apricots, and producing grapes from which is made a wine resembling Marsala. The wall of sun-dried bricks is about 3½ m. in circuit. The streets are narrow and tortuous, and the houses low and flat, but there is a large square, and the bazaars are numerous and spacious. The most remarkable buildings are the citadel, a lofty structure with massive brick walls; the Blue mosque, built in the 17th century by Abbas the Great, but now in ruins; and the villa of the heir apparent to the Persian throne, who resides here as governor of Azerbijan. Tabriz is one of the most important commercial cities in Persia. It is on the caravan route between the interior and Trebizond and Tiflis, and carries on a large foreign trade, also maintaining manufactories of silk and cotton goods. - According to Persian tradition, Tabriz was founded by Zobeida, wife of Haroun al-Rashid; but the town existed in antiquity, and under the name of Ga-zaca was the capital of the Median province of Atropatene. At a later period it was the capital of Tiridates III., king of Armenia. It was visited by Marco Polo about 1293, and in 1320 there appear to have been Venetians settled there, and a Genoese factory in 1341. The present number of European inhabitants probably does not exceed 100. Tabriz has frequently been captured by the Turks, and it has often been damaged by earthquakes.

The Anglo-Indian telegraph line passes through the city. TACHE, Alexandre, a Canadian archbishop, born at Kamouraska, Lower Canada, in 1822. He graduated at the college of 'St. Hyacinthe, became an Oblate of the Immaculate Conception, and in 1843 asked to be sent to the Red River mission. He was ordained priest at St. Boniface, and devoted himself to the Indian tribes beyond the civilized regions of Canada, especially along the valley of the Saskatchewan. He was among the first to penetrate into the unexplored portions of the northwestern territory, and contributed toward the colonization and progress of Manitoba. He was consecrated coadjutor to Bishop Provencher of St. Boniface, Nov. 23, 1851, and succeeded him, June 7, 1853. In September, 1871, he was made metropolitan. During the troubles attendant on the Riel insurrection in 1869-'70 he exerted his influence to prevent the effusion of blood; and after the surrender of Kiel and the latter's election to the Dominion house of commons, the archbishop resisted successfully all attempts of the authorities to punish him as a traitor.

He has established a college and theological seminary at St. Boniface, opposite Fort Garry, and, besides numerous interesting reports on the Indian missions printed in the "Annals of the Propagation of the Faith," has published Vingt annees de missions dans le nord-ouest de V Amerique (Montreal, 1866), and Esquisse sur le nord-ouest de l'Amerique (1869).

City Gate, Tabriz.

City Gate, Tabriz.