Thomas Hooker, one of the founders of the colony of Connecticut, born in Markfield, Leicestershire, England, in 1586, died in Hartford, Conn., July 7, 1647. He is supposed to have been a cousin of the preceding. After graduating at Emmanuel college, Cambridge, he took orders, preached in London, and was chosen lecturer at Chelmsford in 1626. Having been silenced by Laud for nonconformity, he established a grammar school at Little Baddow, near Chelmsford, in which John Eliot, "the apostle of the Indians," was an usher. In 1630, being still persecuted by the spiritual court, he went to Holland, where he preached at Delft and Rotterdam, being an assistant to Dr. Ames, who said of him that "he never met with his equal, either in preaching or disputation." In 1633 he came to New England with Cotton and Stone, and was settled with the latter at Newtown (now Cambridge), being ordained by the brethren of the church. In 1636 he removed with about 100 others to what is now Hartford, Conn., where he and Stone were the first ministers of the church. He was a remarkably animated and able preacher, commonly using no notes. Some 200 of his sermons were transcribed by John Higginson and sent to England, where about half of them were published.

His most celebrated work, "A Survey of the Summe of Church Discipline," written in conjunction with John Cotton, was published in England under the supervision of Dr. Thomas Goodwin (4to, 1648). A memoir of his life, with a selection from his writings, has been published by the Rev. E. W. Hooker, D. D. (18mo, Boston, 1840).