Tolland, a N. E. county of Connecticut, bordering on Massachusetts, drained by the Willimantic and Hop rivers; area, 440 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 22,000. In the W. part the surface is nearly level and the soil fertile, but in the E. part it is very hilly and the soil inferior. It is intersected by the Hartford, Providence, and Fishkill, and Rockville branch, and the New London Northern railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 15,860 bushels of rye, 101,721 of Indian corn, 76,574 of oats, 17,123 of buckwheat, 189,403 of potatoes, 531,399 lbs. of tobacco, 21,530 of wool, 386,763 of butter, 80,671 of cheese, and 40,320 tons of hay. There were 2,401 horses, 6,452 milch cows, 3,436 working oxen, 6,244 other cattle, 7,902 sheep, and 3,851 swine; 1 manufactory of leather belting and hose, 3 of boots and shoes, 5 of boxes, 12 of carriages and wagons, 23 of cotton goods, 2 of hosiery, 3 of iron castings, 8 of machinery, 9 of shoddy, 14 of silk goods, 24 of woollens, 2 bleaching and dyeing establishments, and 8 flour mills.

Capital, Tolland.

YEARS.

Bushels.

18G8...........

16,141,990

1869...........

18,660,949

1870...........

23.714,510

1871...........

35,300,220

1872...........

35,527,285

1873...........

34,849,877

1874...........

39,304,891