Tragopan, a name given by Cuvier to the birds of the pheasant family comprised in the genus cerlornis (Swains.). The bill resembles that of the common fowl; the wings are ample and very concave, with the fourth to the seventh quills the longest; tail rounded, and its coverts ample; tarsi stout and armed with a small spur, anterior toes united at the base by membrane, and the claws long and curved. There are three or four species, inhabitants of the gloomy and thick pine forests of the high mountains of central Asia; they are solitary and shy, and discoverable only by their shrill whistle; the plumage is very brilliant, being red, varied with black, blue, and golden, and with white eye-like spots. The best known species is the horned pheasant (C. satyra, Swains.), of the size of a large domestic fowl; the males have the sides of the head naked, and in the spring behind each eye a long reddish and bluish horn directed obliquely backward, and under the throat long, naked, bluish, expansile wattles; the feathers are lengthened and disunited on the crown, purplish black, becoming crimson on the occiput; back of neck and bare skin in front surrounded by deep black; wings and back brown with an eyed white spot at the end of each feather; rest of plumage deep red with small spots of white; the female and young are brownish, and have neither the horns nor the wattles; the males do not attain the full beauty of their plumage till the third year.

The food consists of grains, roots, insects, and larvae. There are also the golden-breasted and black-headed tragopans, similar to the preceding.

Horned Pheasant (Ceriornis satyra).

Horned Pheasant (Ceriornis satyra).