Treves (Ger. Trier), a town of Rhenish Prussia, on the right bank of the Moselle, 57 m. S. W. of Coblentz; pop. in 1871, 21,442. It is a decayed place, noted for its ultramon-tanism and for a'cathedral which exhibits the development of the Romanesque style from the earliest period down to its completion in the 12th century, and contains remarkable altars, tombs, missals, and relics. (See Der Dom zu Trier, by Wilmowsky, Treves, 1875.) Among the relics is the so-called "holy coat," which pilgrims revere as the seamless garment of the Saviour, and believe to have been deposited in the church by the empress Helena, the alleged founder of the building. The great agitation which resulted in 1844 from the multitudes (estimated at more than 1,000,000) flocking to this shrine was the main origin of the German Catholic denomination. Adjoining the cathedral is the Liebfrauenldrche of the 13th century, one of the earliest and finest specimens of pure Gothic. The university, founded in 1472, was superseded in 1798 by a gymnasium, which contains a city library of 100,000 volumes. In the old electoral palace are the barracks.

The Roman antiquities, more numerous here than anywhere else in Germany, include part of the bridge over the Moselle, an amphitheatre, baths, and the colossal quadrangle known as porta nigra, the most conspicuous of all. The chief articles of trade are fruit, wine, timber, stones, and woollen and other manufactures. - Treves was originally occupied by the Treviri, a Celtic tribe of Belgic Gaul, and under the Romans became the capital of a province under the name of Augusta Trevivorum. In the 4th century the town was improved by Constantine the Great. Under the Franks it was included in the kingdom of Austrasia, and afterward belonged alternately to Lorraine and Germany, till in the 10th century it was permanently annexed to the latter country. Subsequently, under the rule of archbishops, it became with its territory the second German electorate, divided into an upper and lower see, the latter connected with the episcopal capital at Co-blentz. The city of Treves was invested with , sovereign rights from 1580 till its occupation by the French in 1794. The whole electorate was in 1797 incorporated with France. In 1814 Treves was annexed to Prussia. The suppression of the priests' seminary, Dec. 31,1873, and the subsequent imprisonment of the bishop, produced disturbances which were quelled in March, 1874.

Porta Nigra, Treves.

Porta Nigra, Treves.