Trinity College, an institution of learning in Hartford, Conn., under the control of the Protestant Episcopal church, chartered in 1823 and opened in 1824. Until 1845 its name was Washington college. Its presidents have been: 1824-'31, the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Brownell, D. D., bishop of Connecticut; 1831-'7, the Rev. N. S. Wheaton, D. D.; 1837-'48, the Rev. Silas Totten, D. D.; 1848-'53, the Rt. Rev. John Williams, D. D.; 1853-'60, the Rev. Daniel R. Goodwin, D. D.; 1861-'4, Samuel Eliot; 1864-'6, the Rt. Rev. J. B. Kerfoot, D. D.; 1867-'74, the Rev. Abner Jackson, D. D. Dr. Jackson was succeeded by the Rev. T. R. Pynchon, D .D., who still holds the office (1876). In 1872 the college grounds were sold for $600,000, to be used as a site for the new state capitol. Soon afterward the college purchased 78 acres within the city limits, a mile south of the old location. There is now in process of erection here an imposing college structure, in the form of a quadrangle 1,050 ft. long and 376 ft. wide, and enclosing three courts containing an aggregate of about four acres. It is in the early English style of architecture, with gateways and a noble tower and spire 240 ft. high.

It will comprise dormitories for 300 students, recitation rooms, chapel, library, museum, dining hall, theatre, astronomical observatory, and dwellings for the faculty. The college is to be removed to the new site in 1877. The whole number of the alumni of Trinity college is 1,063, of whom 262 have been ordained to the ministry. In 1875-6 there were, besides the president, 8 professors, 3 other instructors, and 2 lecturers; the total number of students was 83. The course of instruction, in which all the studies are prescribed, occupies four years. Students may take special courses in studies pertaining to science, and on their completion receive the degree of bachelor of science. Besides 37 scholarships entitling the holders to free tuition, there are several which yield to needy students annual incomes ranging from $100"to $300. Nearly all of them are designed to aid students preparing for the ministry in the Protestant Episcopal church. The college has property amounting in 1875 to $1,068,296, a library of 18,000 volumes, exclusive of pamphlets and duplicates, and a valuable cabinet. Excepting $16,000 received from the state, the funds of the college have been contributed by individuals.

A theological school was organized in 1851, and was continued for about three years, when the Berkeley divinity school at Middletown was established to take its place.

New Buildings of Trinity College, Hartford.

New Buildings of Trinity College, Hartford.