Ulfila, Or Wulfila Ulfilas Ulphilas, a Gothic bishop, born among the Goths in 310 or 311, died in Constantinople about 381. He is believed to have belonged to a family of Cappadocian Christians, whom the Goths had carried into captivity about 267. He was master of the Gothic, Greek, and Hebrew languages, became bishop of the Goths in 341, and in 348, at the head of the Christian minority of his people, and with the permission of the emperor Constantius, he settled in Moesian territory, near Nicopolis. He persuaded his followers to devote themselves to agriculture and the peaceful arts, while the pagan majority only thought of war. He propagated among his people the love of letters, formed an alphabet of 24 characters based on the Greek, and translated for popular use into Moeso-Gothic the whole Bible except the books of Kings. This version, in which it is thought he was assisted by his friend and successor Senelas, and of which only fragments exist, is the earliest known specimen of the Teutonic language. Among its recent editors and commentators are Gabelenz, Lobe, Massmann, and Stamm. A new edition, by E. Bernhardt, with various readings, a commentary, and critical introduction, together with the Greek text, appeared at Halle in 1876. Ulfilas's Bible was in constant use among the Gothic peoples so long as they preserved their nationality. (See Gothic Language and Literature, vol. viii., pp. 124, 125, and Argenteus Codex.) He was a semiArian, subscribed the creed of Rimini in 359, was at the Arian synod of Constantinople in 360, and died while attending the oecumenical council of 381. - See Waitz, Ueber das Leben und die Lehre des Ulfilas (1840), and Bessel, Ueber das Leben des Ulfilas und die Bekehrung der Gothen (1860).

Furze or Gorse (Ulex Europseus).

Furze or Gorse (Ulex Europseus).