Wall Flower, a perennial cruciferous plant, cheiranthus cheiri (from the Arabic name cheiri). It is a native of southern Europe, but is naturalized in northern and central Europe. It was introduced into England from Spain over 300 years ago as wall gillofer, which became wall gilliflower and wall flower; it was called wall gillofer from growing in rocky places and on old walls, to distinguish it from the common gillofer, which is now called stock gilliflower. (See Gilliflowee.) The flattened pods, the wingless seeds, the much less hoary foliage, and the orange-colored flowers of the wall flower allow it to be readily distinguished from the gilliflower. It grows 1 to 2 ft. high, with lance-shaped entire leaves, and blooms in early spring, its flowers being very fragrant, especially at evening. Cultivation has produced many varieties, both single and double, the color of the flowers varying from yellow to blood-red, and some being handsomely variegated; the choicer kinds are propagated by cuttings, as they do not come true from seeds, which the doubles rarely produce. In the northern states this plant can only be cultivated by preserving it during winter in a cool greenhouse or a pit. The seeds are sown in spring, and the plants will bloom in the following spring.

Several other species are cultivated in Europe.

Wall Flower (Cheiranthus cheiri).

Wall Flower (Cheiranthus cheiri).