Wart Hog, a name given to the African swine of the genus phacochcerus (F. Cuv.), from the large warty protuberances on each cheek. In this genus the feet are four-toed; there is a thick callosity in front of each fore limb, produced by their habit of falling on their knees when digging for the bulbs and roots on which they feed; the warts are about 1½ in- below the eyes, made up of fibrous tissue mixed with fat; the eyes are very small and high up, ears large, and sense of smell acute; there are 13 dorsal and 6 lumbar vertebrae; tail naked and slender, tapering, but dilated and tufted at the end; the molar teeth vary, according to age, from 3 to 5 on each side in each jaw, and are composed of closely set cylindrical tubes surrounded by enamel, the last being very long; canines large, projecting upward and outward; incisors 2/6 or 2/4, generally deciduous. The length is between 3½ and 4 ft., with a tail of 1 ft.; though small, they have a large head with formidable tusks, and a very fierce and unprepossessing look.

The mammae are four, two inguinal and two abdominal, an inch behind the navel; the roof of the mouth has more than 20 transverse arched ridges; the intestinal canal is about eight times the length of the body; the stomach is more simple than in the common hog, the small intestines relatively shorter, and the large relatively longer; the pharynx has two large mucous pouches. The best known species is the African wart hog or harvja (P. Aeliqrd, Rupp.), from Abyssinia and the Guinea and Mozambique coasts; it has persistent incisors, with scanty long bristles of a light brown color, and a mane between the ears extending along the neck and back, sometimes 10 in. long. - In the allied genus potamochmrus (Gray), or river hogs, the ears are elongated, tapering, ending in a pencil of hairs; the face is elongated, and is rendered hideous by a long protuberance on each side, half way between the nose and eyes; tail thick, high up the rump; upper part of intermaxillary bones swollen and rough; upper canines large, arising from a prominent bony case on the side of the jaws, and curved upward.

The masked water hog, or bosch varh (P. Africanus, Gray), is generally black, with whitish cheeks having a large central black spot; it is an inhabitant of S. Africa, and is very savage and ill-looking. The painted pig of the Cameroons (P. penicillatus, Schinz), from the Gold coast of W. Africa, is bright red bay, with black face, forehead, and ears. These hogs are hunted for their flesh. - See Andersson's "Okavango River" (1861).

Masked Water Hog (Potamochoerua Africanus).

Masked Water Hog (Potamochoerua Africanus).