Rostock

Rostock, a fortified town of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, on the left bank of the Warnow, about 9 m. above its mouth in the Baltic sea, and 95 m. N. E. of Hamburg; pop. in 1871, 30,980. It has a university founded in 1419, which in 1874 had 34 professors and teachers and 135 students, with a library of 80,000 volumes. There are also a school of navigation, a gymnasium, a botanic garden, and various literary and charitable institutions. Rostock is a place of great antiquity; in the middle ages it was a member of the Hanseatic league, and its commerce is still very extensive.

Roswell Sabine Ripley

Roswell Sabine Ripley, an American soldier, born in Ohio about 1823, died in Charleston, S. C, in August, 1863. He graduated at the military academy at West Point in 1843, and was appointed brevet second lieutenant in the artillery. He served during the war with Mexico, and was brevetted as captain and major for gallant conduct at Cerro Gordo and Chapulte-pec. He subsequently served in Florida, and in 1853 resigned his commission in the army, taking up his residence at Charleston. On the breaking out of the civil war he entered the confederate service, rose to the rank of brigadier general, and was wounded at Antietam. He published a "History of the War with Mexico" (2 vols. 8vo, New York, 1849).

Rothesay

Rothesay, a town of Scotland, capital of Buteshire, at the head of Rothesay bay on the E. side of the island of Bute, 30 m. W. of Glasgow; pop. in 1871, 7,800. It has a good harbor. The houses are built of greenstone, and in the suburbs are numerous villas and gardens. There are ship-building yards, tanneries, a distillery, and a cotton mill, and many of the inhabitants are employed in fishing and coasting. It has lately become a watering place and a resort for consumptive patients. The ancient castle of Rothesay, now in ruins (having been burnt by the duke of Argyle in 1685), was given by Robert III., who died in it, to his son David, with the title of duke of Rothesay, which the prince of Wales still holds.

Rotifera

See Animalcules, vol. i., p. 517.

Roualeyn George Gordon Cumming

Roualeyn George Gordon Cumming, a Scottish sportsman and author, born March 15, 1820, died at Fort Augustus, Inverness-shire, March 24, 1866. He was the second son of Sir William Gordon Gordon Cumming, and from an early age had abundant experiences as a deerstalker in the highlands of Badenoch. He spent some years in the military service in India and the Cape of Good Hope, but left the army about 1843. Between October of that year and March, 1849, he made five hunting expeditions into various parts of South Africa, which he recorded in his " Hunter's Life in South Africa" (London, 1850). His adventures partake so largely of the marvellous that their accuracy has more than once been questioned. He derived a considerable profit from the skins, tusks, and other trophies of the chase, of which he opened an exhibition on his return to England. He claimed to have killed more than 100 elephants.